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#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string>
#include<string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;

void OpCode()
{
    string mnemonic;
    int hex;
    char *op;

    cout << "Entre mnemonic : ";
    cin >> mnemonic;

    char *str1 = strdup(mnemonic.c_str());

    if(strcmp(str1, "ADD") == 0)
    {
        hex = 24;
        itoa(hex,op,16);
        cout << op;
        cout << "\nEqual";
    }
    else
    cout << "\nFalse";
}

int main()
{
    OpCode();
    return 0;
}

It runs till the part where I use the op variable, I tried copying and pasting in the main function it worked perfectly, why wouldnt it work in OpCode function?! Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
2  
You're stomping over memory that's not yours. Now's a good time to learn how to use a debugger. – chris Nov 18 '13 at 11:39
1  
Hint: why did you use strdup on the variable str1? And why aren't you doing the same on op? – Lundin Nov 18 '13 at 11:41

itoa writes into memory pointed to by its second argument. It does not allocate that memory itself. This means its up to you to pass it a valid memory pointer. You're not; you never allocate any memory. It worked when in main by luck not design.

A simple way would be to replace line where you define op to char op[9]; but remember that this is locally allocated memory so you couldn't return it from the function.

share|improve this answer

Here is the fix with a comments

include

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string>
#include<string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;

void OpCode()
{
    string mnemonic;
    int hex;
    char op[10];  // allocate a pointer op that points to 10 empty spaces of type char.

    cout << "Entre mnemonic : ";
    cin >> mnemonic;

    char *str1 = strdup(mnemonic.c_str());

    if(strcmp(str1, "ADD") == 0)
    {
        hex = 24;
        itoa(hex,op,16);   // convert hex to an ASCII representation and write the ASCII to the 10 empty spaces we allocated earlier.
        cout << op;
        cout << "\nEqual";
    }
    else
    cout << "\nFalse";
    free (str1); // free the memory that was allocated using strdup so you do not leak memory!
}

int main()
{
    OpCode();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
do not use strdup in the first place as you should check the return value may be null if there is not enough memory to duplicate the string. – Mahmoud Fayez Nov 18 '13 at 11:45
    
to print the hex value of a number or integer just use printf !! – Mahmoud Fayez Nov 18 '13 at 11:47

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