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I need help with solving this ruby array question.

Get all the subsets of an array. Unique set only. No repeats of any number. num_subset([1,2,3]) ==> result should be [[], ["1"], ["1", "2"], ["1", "2", "3"], ["1", "3"], ["2"], ["2", "3"], ["3"]]

def num_subset(arr)
    holder =[]
    order_subset = [[]]

    (arr.length).times do |m|  
        arr.map do |n|
            holder += [n]  
            order_subset << holder
        end
    holder =[]  # resets holder
    arr.shift  # takes the first element out
    end
    order_subset
end

My result ==> [[], ["1"], ["1", "2"], ["1", "2", "3"], ["2"], ["2", "3"], ["3"]. My problem is that I am missing one result ["1", "3"]

Need some help pointing me to the right direction. Spent hours on this already. Do not use #combination short cut. I need to work this out manually.

share|improve this question
1  
"Subsets of an array" does not make sense. "Subsets of a set" or "Sub-arrays of an array" would make sense. In other words, would [1, 1, 2, 3] be allowed as an argument? If it is, then would that be equivalent to [1, 2, 3]? If not, then what result would be expected? –  sawa Nov 18 '13 at 12:17
    
@sawa, it is a unique set only. no repeats. –  hken27 Nov 18 '13 at 12:31

2 Answers 2

a = [1, 2, 3]
arr = []

for i in 0..(a.length) do
  arr = arr + a.combination(i).to_a
end

> arr
# [[], [1], [2], [3], [1, 2], [1, 3], [2, 3], [1, 2, 3]]
share|improve this answer
    
I know that already. Trying to working out the problem instead of using #combination short cut. –  hken27 Nov 18 '13 at 12:37
1  
@hken27 You didn't write that in the question. You should have. –  sawa Nov 18 '13 at 12:38
    
@Santosh Close, but yours is wrong. The i should start at 0. –  sawa Nov 18 '13 at 12:38
1  
@sawa, Thanks for pointing it out. I didnt notice the [] in the qs. It was not easily readable. Corrected my answer –  Santhosh Nov 18 '13 at 16:06
    
Having [] is the normal definition. Assuming otherwise should require special motivation. Readability should not matter. Good that you corrected it. –  sawa Nov 18 '13 at 16:09

Looks like you're looking at a starting point somewhere in the array and then looking at all sub arrays from that starting point on, after which you move the starting point down. That way, you're missing the sub arrays with gaps. For [1,2,3], the only sub array with a gap is [1,3].

For example (ignoring [] since you've hardcoded that)

[(1),2,3,4] -> [1]
[(1,2),3,4] -> [1,2]
[(1,2,3),4] -> [1,2,3]
[(1,2,3,4)] -> [1,2,3,4]
[1,(2),3,4] -> [2]
[1,(2,3),4] -> [2,3]
[1,(2,3,4)] -> [2,3,4]
[1,2,(3),4] -> [3]
[1,2,(3,4)] -> [3,4]
[1,2,3,(4)] -> [4]

So I'd expect your output for [1,2,3,4] to be [[],[1],[1,2],[1,2,3],[1,2,3,4],[2],[2,3],[2,3,4],[3],[3,4],[4]].

You really need to rethink your algorithm. You could try recursion. Take the head of your array (1), construct all possible sub arrays of the tail ([2,3]), duplicate that, and prefix half of it with the head. Of course, to construct the sub arrays, you call the same function, all the way down to an empty array.

[1,2,3] ->
....[2,3] ->
........[3] ->
............[] ->
................# an empty array is its own answer
................[]
............# duplicating the empty array and prefixing one with 3
............[3], []
........# duplicating the result from the last step and prefixing half with 2
........[2,3], [2], [3], []
....# duplicating the result from the last step and prefixing half with 1
....[1,2,3], [1,2], [1,3], [1], [2,3], [2], [3], []
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that is what I expect. Any thoughts? –  hken27 Nov 18 '13 at 12:29
    
@hken27 See my updated answer. –  SQB Nov 18 '13 at 12:46
    
Yes, I am missing something in the algorithm that's why I need some help. If using ([1,2,3,4]) missing [1,3,4] , [2,4], etc –  hken27 Nov 18 '13 at 12:48

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