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I'm using EasyMock to create mock objects for JUnit testing in Java. I create a mock object and pass it to another thread where it expects methods to be called. In the other thread, the calls are enclosed in a try/catch(Throwable) block, so when an unexpected call occurs on the mock and it thus throws AssertionError, that error is caught by the catch block and treated. So, even though an unexpected call occurred, the test passes.

In order to have the test fail as expected, I would like to delay all verification of calls to the EasyMock.verify(mock) call made in the test-runner thread at the end. Is this possible and how?

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4 Answers 4

I'm not sure about how to do this with EasyMock, but this behavior is possible with Mockito because verification assertions can be specified at the end of the test.

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The correct solution I'd guess is to stop catching Throwable. Doing so catches all Errors as you're finding, which can be quite dangerous... are you absolutely positively 100% sure you need to catch Throwable? Why?

(If it turns out you do, you could catch AssertionError specifically and rethrow it. But that's ugly!)

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1  
We catch Throwable (ugly, I agree) so we can intercept (e.g.) Out-of-memory errors and do some logging and restart the app cleanly from that point. I'll maybe resort to catching AssertionError if no other solution is available. –  Philipp Jan 5 '10 at 10:32
    
@Steven - catching AssertionError and rethrowing it is almost certainly less ugly than an unconditional catch (Throwable t) block. :-) –  Andrzej Doyle Jan 5 '10 at 14:45

Try using nice mocks:

http://easymock.org/EasyMock2_5_2_Documentation.html

"Nice Mocks On a Mock Object returned by createMock() the default behavior for all methods is to throw an AssertionError for all unexpected method calls. If you would like a "nice" Mock Object that by default allows all method calls and returns appropriate empty values (0, null or false), use createNiceMock() instead. "

Default values will be returned for unexpected calls instead of throwing AssertionError, but you can still verify them with the verify() method (in which case the AssertionErrors will be thrown)

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I also agree with deterb's suggestion: Mockito does provide a simpler mocking mechanism (i.e not having to worry about nice/strick mocks) and you can verify only the behavior you actually need. –  Fabio Kenji Jan 5 '10 at 14:40
    
+1: It's not worth switching libraries when your current one provides the functionality you need! –  Andrzej Doyle Jan 5 '10 at 14:45
1  
-1: A nice mock will accept any method call, and thus will not allow to test if unexpected calls happened (only if expected calls did not happen). –  Philipp Jan 5 '10 at 16:18
    
You're right, haven't seen it that way; I've tried to experiment with it though and could not find a better solution. Perhaps you could try to decrease the granularity of your test such as testing a more specific method. –  Fabio Kenji Jan 7 '10 at 11:29

As @deterb suggested, it's possible with Mockito but you have to know the method name or you have to set expectations for every method. Here is an example:

The mocked interface:

public interface MyInterface {

    void allowedMethod();

    void disallowedMethod();
}

The user class which catches AssertionError:

public class UserClass {

    public UserClass() {
    }

    public static void throwableCatcher(final MyInterface myInterface) {
        try {
            myInterface.allowedMethod();
            myInterface.disallowedMethod();
        } catch (final Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("Catched throwable: " + t.getMessage());
        }
    }
}

And the Mockito test:

@Test
public void testMockito() throws Exception {
    final MyInterface myInterface = mock(MyInterface.class);

    UserClass.throwableCatcher(myInterface);

    verify(myInterface, never()).disallowedMethod(); // fails here
}

The same is possible with EasyMock but it needs some work:

@Test
public void testEasyMock() throws Exception {
    final AtomicBoolean called = new AtomicBoolean();
    final MyInterface myInterface = createMock(MyInterface.class);
    myInterface.allowedMethod();

    myInterface.disallowedMethod();
    final IAnswer<? extends Object> answer = new IAnswer<Object>() {

        @Override
        public Object answer() throws Throwable {
            System.out.println("answer");
            called.set(true);
            throw new AssertionError("should not call");
        }

    };
    expectLastCall().andAnswer(answer).anyTimes();

    replay(myInterface);

    UserClass.throwableCatcher(myInterface);

    verify(myInterface);
    assertFalse("called", called.get()); // fails here
}

Unfortunately you also have to know the method names here and you have to define expectations like myInterface.disallowedMethod() and expectLastCall().andAnswer(answer).anyTimes().

Another possibility is creating a proxy with the Proxy class (with a custom InvocationHandler) and using it as a mock object. It definitely needs more work but it could be the most customizable solution.

Finally don't forget that it's also possible to create a custom implementation with or without delegation to the EasyMock mock object. Here is one with delegation:

public class MockedMyInterface implements MyInterface {

    private final MyInterface delegate;

    private final AtomicBoolean called = new AtomicBoolean();

    public MockedMyInterface(final MyInterface delegate) {
        this.delegate = delegate;
    }

    @Override
    public void allowedMethod() {
        delegate.allowedMethod();
    }

    @Override
    public void disallowedMethod() {
        called.set(true);
        throw new AssertionError("should not call");
    }

    public boolean isCalled() {
        return called.get();
    }

}

And the test for it:

@Test
public void testEasyMockWithCustomClass() throws Exception {
    final MyInterface myInterface = createMock(MyInterface.class);
    myInterface.allowedMethod();

    final MockedMyInterface mockedMyInterface = 
        new MockedMyInterface(myInterface);

    replay(myInterface);

    UserClass.throwableCatcher(mockedMyInterface);

    verify(myInterface);
    assertFalse("called", mockedMyInterface.isCalled()); // fails here
}
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