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I have declared a prototype function A.a but would like to provide some syntactic sugar by other functions, e.g. A.sayHi and A.sayBye. The problem is binding the context because of course I'd like it to point to the instance but don't have access to it when I declare the prototype.

function A() {
    this.txt = 'so';
};

A.prototype.a = function (txt) {
    alert(txt + ' ' + this.txt);
}

A.prototype.sayHi = A.prototype.a.bind(A, 'hi');

A.prototype.sayBye = A.protoype.a.bind(A.prototype, 'bye');

When I do new A().sayHi().sayBye(); I get alerts with "hi undefined" and "bye undefined". Sure, I can do

A.prototype.sayHi = function() {
    this.a('hi');
}; 

but that's ugly :)

Is there a way that I keep the context of the instance (so that this.txt equals 'so') without writing a function?

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1  
You won't be able to do this. The problem is because your bind code is being ran before any instance is created, hence you will never be able to pass the correct this value. –  Matt Nov 18 '13 at 14:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Bind is not what you want.

Bind is designed to create a function that wraps a this pointer (which must exist when Bind is called), to avoid having to write lots of temporary functions like

var that = this;
callMeBack(function() { that.callback(); });

(i.e. the above becomes)

callMeBack(this.callback.Bind(this));

It can be used for partial application / limited currying, but in your case you don't have a this at the point you're trying to call Bind. You definitely don't want either the constructor or its prototype object to be this, you want this to be the actual object, but that doesn't exist when you run this code.

Your last example is exactly right.


Digression: I don't think it is ugly - it is clear, and explicit, and highly idiomatic Javascript. Perhaps a touch verbose. If you think this is ugly, then you may not be used to Javascript yet. Get used to functions as first-class data, e.g.:

var A = function() { ... };

instead of

function A { ... }

the former being what Javascript means by the latter. Getting into the habit of thinking of functions as just another data-type, will help you 'get' Javascript and see its inherent beauty. And will have the side-effect that you won't be offended by the 'ugly' on show when you program for node.js :)

share|improve this answer
    
That's been my thinking exactly, bind doesn't work because it only works on instances. I wanted to curry A.a by creating A.sayHi, but I guess that's not possible without having access to the context (i.e. by creating a function that wraps it). –  godspeedelbow Nov 18 '13 at 15:08
    
@godspeedelbow Well, because you can create and return functions at will, if you want a function that currys for prototypes, and applies the correct pointer at runtime, when it is available, you can write that. Shreyas gives an example of doing that. There's very little point for just one or two uses, however, you may as well use the 'ugly' approach. But it does nicely illustrate how powerful local functions and lexical typing are. –  Ian Nov 18 '13 at 15:12
    
Shreyas answer doesn't really guarantee that this has the right value, it's a more complicated looking answer than the one Grundy gave. You can only guarantee value of this when passing the function as a closure/use bind or declaring the function in the constructor body (me=this;this.sayHi=function(){me.a("Hi")}). –  HMR Nov 18 '13 at 17:07
    
@HMR - I think you're mistaking what I / Shreyas am suggesting. The behavior you suggest is the behavior of Bind, but the point is Bind is not the right tool for the OP's job. The OP gave an example of what he/she wanted, but thought it was 'ugly' and was trying to use Bind to make it more beautiful. Bind was not the right tool for that job, and your code wouldn't work either. –  Ian Nov 18 '13 at 19:07
    
Although a couple of interesting work arounds given, it's indeed clear that it's not possible. I'll accept your answer, thanks! As a side note, the reason I think it's 'ugly' is because unnecessarily adding function wrappers instead of binding creates boilerplate. I was hoping there might be a way to do this elegantly on the prototype with something else than bind but alas. Now I'll happily write those function bodies. –  godspeedelbow Nov 18 '13 at 19:19

you can try little change a function

function A() {
    this.txt = 'so';
};

A.prototype.a = function (txt) {
    return function(){
        alert(txt + ' ' + this.txt);
        return this;
    }
}

A.prototype.sayHi = A.prototype.a("Hi")

A.prototype.sayBye = A.protoype.a('bye');
share|improve this answer
    
Cool answer! So effectively, we disable A.a a little bit so that we can curry it :) The downside is that A.a behaves differently now, so that you'd almost want only available as a private function. –  godspeedelbow Nov 18 '13 at 15:28
    
Nice. You'd still need another function if you want to have the generic version too, unless you're happy to write foo.a("Hola")(); –  Ian Nov 18 '13 at 15:30
    
This doesn't really bind the functions to an instance though: var a = new A(); var b = {}; b.sayHi = a.sayHi; b.sayHi(); this.txt is undefined now. –  HMR Nov 18 '13 at 16:46
    
@HMR - that's exactly what I'd expect it to. The point of what godspeedelbow seemed to be doing was to form a partial application on a prototype method, not bind a this pointer, which is exactly why Bind was not the right tool. If you really did want to bind the this pointer, then you'd have to do something else, but since the OP didn't even have an object created, I assumed this was not needed. And it seems like the asker agrees. If you want to create a new question with an example of when you'd need to do what you're saying here, we can try to give a clearer answer. –  Ian Nov 18 '13 at 19:06
    
@HMR yep, because there is no txt field in b –  Grundy Nov 19 '13 at 5:26

Does this work for you?

function runtimeContextBinder(func){
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
 return function(){
   func.apply(this,args);
 }
}

function A() {
    this.txt = 'so';
};

A.prototype.a = function (txt) {
    alert(txt + ' ' + this.txt);
}

A.prototype.sayHi = runtimeContextBinder(A.prototype.a,'hi');

A.prototype.sayBye = runtimeContextBinder(A.prototype.a, 'bye');

What I'm doing here is to create a closure on the function, which is then executed in the context of the instance.

share|improve this answer
    
You're generating elbow's 'ugly' local function from within another function :) Nicely meta. –  Ian Nov 18 '13 at 14:57
1  
Yeah, that would work but as Ian said, you're creating a closure in runtimeContextBinder which effectively does the same as writing a function, but then only once. Thanks anyways though! –  godspeedelbow Nov 18 '13 at 15:02
    
@Ian So what is Function.prototype.bind doing internally? –  C5H8NNaO4 Nov 18 '13 at 15:19
1  
Would appreciate some help with comment formatting!! –  Shreyas Nov 18 '13 at 15:31
1  
@Ian it should be 0. Else you'll lose out the first argument. this pointer is not present in the arguments. –  Shreyas Nov 18 '13 at 15:38

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