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I have struct

struct Course{
  int cId;
  string courseName;
};

and I want to add students for each Course. I thought to define another struct in to struct Course like

struct Course{
      int cId;
      string courseName;
      struct Student{
         int sId;
         string studentName;
      };
    };

if I define struct like this how could I use it ? I have Course * cptr = new Course[1]; which for using the struct course. How could I add Students to specified cId's ?

share|improve this question
    
Nested structs? Why??? Is there any good reason to do that? –  Adriano Repetti Nov 18 '13 at 15:28
    
Add a member for the struct you have declared inside the other one. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 18 '13 at 15:28
3  
You should have attended class when they taught arrays –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 18 '13 at 15:28
    
@MichaelGoldshteyn: You should have attended class when they taught standard containers. –  phresnel Nov 18 '13 at 15:31
    
@phresnel, if you read the original poster's comments to answers, you will see that there was no such class! –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 18 '13 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
struct Course
{
    // ...
    struct Student
    {
        int sId;
        string studentName;
    };
};

This defines a struct Course and another struct Course::Student, but Course does not instantiate any student (there is no member of Course which has a type Student). If you want students to be a member of course, you need something like this:

struct Course
{
    // ...
    struct Student
    {
        int sId;
        string studentName;
    } student;
};

or

struct Course
{
    // ...
    struct Student
    {
        int sId;
        string studentName;
    } students[10];
};

Which would define a single student or an array of 10 students as members of Course, respectively. (NOTE: std::vector would be a better choice than a statically sized array)

Alternatively, you can declare Student as a struct outside of Course:

struct Student { ... };

struct Course
{
    // ...
    Student student;
    // or std::vector<Student> students;
    // or std::array<Student, 10> students;
    // or Student* students
};
share|improve this answer
    
but number of students could change the execution so, I should allocate memory dynamically. How could I do that ? instead of using student[10] ? –  mxyz Nov 18 '13 at 15:34
    
@mxyz You would use a pointer and allocated it using new[] (and deallocating using delete[]). If that is your requirement, the last // or in my last example would be the method you would need to use - if you are not permitted to use std::vector. –  Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 15:35
    
For example I have cptr[1].cId (it is unique) for specified course if I want to add students to this course how could I use stedents ? –  mxyz Nov 18 '13 at 15:40
    
Assuming that cptr[1] is an instance of Course, It would be something like cptr[1].students = new Student[SIZE]; cptr[1].students[0].sId = SOMEID; –  Zac Howland Nov 18 '13 at 15:56

Your Course does not contain a Student. It just defines a struct of that name, i.e. a type Course::Student. For a type to contain an instance of another type, you just have to declare a member variable:

struct Student { .... };

struct Course
{
  ....
  Student student;
};

If you want each course to hold more than one Student, then you can use a container. In the absence of more information, the best candidate for that is std::vector:

struct Course
{
  ....
  std::vector<Student> students;
};
share|improve this answer

A very simple way:

struct Student
{
    int sId;
    string studentName;
};

struct Course
{
    int cId;
    string courseName;
    std::vector <Student> students;
};

This way you may write

Student s;
Course c;
c.students.push_back(s);
share|improve this answer

std::vector is your friend, but if you are not allowed to use that, you can do:

struct Student {...}; // Implementation omitted for brevity...

struct Course
{
  Student *students_; // Use students_=new Student[num_students]; to allocate
                      // memory dynamically
};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but it isn't allowed to use vectors –  mxyz Nov 18 '13 at 15:30
    
@mxyz, updated to use a pointer instead –  Michael Goldshteyn Nov 18 '13 at 15:32

I prefer you to divide this struct into two individual struct. Then you can initialize a student object in the Course struct. Or u can implement a function in Course struct to link with Student struct.

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