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I am trying to create a function that removes a specified character from a string.

I am only halfway done with the code because I got stuck when I am trying to replace the character to delete with nothing. I just realized I can't put "nothing" in an element of an array so my plan just got ruined.

I figure that I have to loop through the whole string, and when I find the character I want to remove I have to remove it by moving all of the elements that are in front of the "bad" character one step back. Is that correct?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void del(char string[], char charToDel)
{

    int index = 0;

    while(string[index] != '\0')
    {
        if(string[index] == charToDel){
            string[index] = string[index+1];
        }

        index++;
    }

    printf("%s", string);
}

int main(void)
{

    char string[] = "Hello world";

    del(string, 'l');

    return 0;
}

I want to make this program without pointers. Just plain simple code.

I added another while loop that moves every character in the loop to the left but it doesn't seem to work since the output is just plain blank.

int index = 0;


    while(string[index] != '\0')
       {
           if(string[index] == charToDel)
           {
                while(string[index] != '\0')
                {
                    string[index] = string[index+1];
                }

           }

           index++;
       }

    printf("%s", string);
}

Johathan Leffler's Method?

        char newString[100];

    int index = 0;
    int i = 0;

    while(string[index] != '\0')
       {
           if(string[index] != charToDel)
           {
                newString[i] = string[index];

                index++;
                i++;

           }
           i++;
           index++;
       }

    printf("%s", newString);
}

This gives me a lot of weird characters...

share|improve this question
    
You are correct, but you didn't implement it correctly. –  timrau Nov 18 '13 at 15:36
    
The algorithm you describe is correct, but the code you posted does not do the same thing you describe – it only overwrites the deleted character with a copy of the following character. –  Arkku Nov 18 '13 at 15:36
2  
I'm not convinced your use of 'in front of it' and 'one step back' ties in with ordinary English usage (and I realize English might not be your native language). Generally, if you have a string "abc" and you are deleting b, English speakers would regard a as being at the front, c as being at the back. What you say implies you might end up with "aac". You actually need to copy the string over itself, except when you encounter the character to be deleted. You need two separate indexes (or pointers) to record 'copy from' or source position and 'copy to' or destination position. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 18 '13 at 15:49
2  
Regarding I want to make this program without pointers. Just plain simple code. writing in C without using pointers is like riding a bike without tires. You will not get far. –  ryyker Nov 18 '13 at 15:59
1  
add newString[i] = '\0';, omg didn't noticed : you also have an i++ too much –  Gabson Nov 18 '13 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

char const *in = string;
char *out = string;

while (*in) {
    if (*in != charToDel)
        *out++ = *in;
    ++in;
}

*out = '\0';

or without pointers

size_t in = 0;
size_t out = 0;

while (string[in]) {
    if (string[in] != charToDel)
         string[out++] = string[in];
    ++in;
}

string[out] = '\0';
share|improve this answer
    
How can you perform *out++ = *in when out is a char const *? –  timrau Nov 18 '13 at 15:38
    
Providing a complete solution is not a good idea. –  haccks Nov 18 '13 at 15:39
    
thx; fixed it.. –  ensc Nov 18 '13 at 15:39
1  
@haccks - regarding Providing a complete solution is not a good idea. Who says? I see them all over this place on this site, and they are sometimes very instructional.. –  ryyker Nov 18 '13 at 16:02
1  
@MohammadS.; I missed one word in that comment: always. –  haccks Nov 18 '13 at 16:32

The problem is that, when you are assigning string[index+1] to string[index], the next l from the string took place of previous one and index incremented to its next value by 1and this l is not deleted by your function. You should have to fixed that.
As suggested by Jonathan Leffler and Gabson; you can do it by coping the string to itself as;

void del(char string[], char charToDel)
{

    int index = 0, i = 0;

    while(string[index] != '\0')
    {
        if(string[index] != charToDel){
            string[i++] = string[index];
        }
        index++;
    }
    string[i] = '\0';

    printf("%s", string);
}
share|improve this answer

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