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I am trying to create a .NET assembly (language does not matter as such; C#, VB.NET or C++/CLI are all acceptable) that can serve as a drop-in replacement for an existing COM object (consumed by VB6). In and of itself, this works nicely, using the proper attributes.

I am running into a few mapping issues, however:

  1. the existing COM object uses parametrized properties; this seems to rule out C# because it does not support them (an indexer + IndexerNameAttribute does not help, since it only supports creating one such property per interface)

    Example IDL:

    [propput, helpstring("prop1")]
    HRESULT prop1([in] LONG ix1, [in] double prop1);
    
    [propget, helpstring("prop1")]
    HRESULT prop1([in] LONG ix1, [out, retval] double* prop1);
    
    [propput, helpstring("prop2")]
    HRESULT prop2([in] LONG ix1, [in] double prop2);
    
    [propget, helpstring("prop2")]
    HRESULT prop2([in] LONG ix1, [out, retval] double* prop2);
    

    In C# I can have either one, but not both:

    [IndexerName("prop1")]
    double this[[In] long ix1] { get; set; }
    
    [IndexerName("prop2")]
    double this[[In] long ix1] { get; set; }
    

    => second one is flagged as duplicate by the compiler (same signature)

    => I tried inheriting from subinterfaces, each providing its own property, but with COM that inheritance is lost (and the client crashes trying to call the getter/setter)

    => not a huge problem, VB.NET remains viable (not entirely sure about C++/CLI), but see point 2 for why this is not ideal

  2. COM helpstring() attributes are based on .NET Description attributes; but for properties these need to be on the getter/setter, not on the property itself. Not a problem in C#, but in VB.NET there does not seem to be any way to put attributes specifically on the getter/setter of a property in an interface.

    => IL manipulation allows me to work around this, but that's not ideal; and in the end the helpstring is only a minor cosmetic issue.

  3. Methods taking pointer-to-safearray.

    IDL:

    [id(666), helpstring("A Sample Method")]
    HRESULT ArrayMethod([in]  SAFEARRAY(double)* doubles,
                        [out] SAFEARRAY(BSTR)* strings);
    

    Here the in parameter is also specified as a pointer-to-safearray; unusual but valid.

    Coding this as

    [DispId(666), Description("A Sample Method")]
    void ArrayMethod([In] ref double[] doubles, out string[] strings);
    

    results in an exactly matching signature in the typelib for the assembly. However, a call to the method results in "SafeArray cannot be marshaled to this array type because it has either nonzero lower bounds or more than one dimension.". So, it looks like the marshaling code for .NET does not actually handle this case properly...

  4. Array property setters.

    Here the problem is in the COM signature:

    [id(13), propput, helpstring("A Bunch Of Doubles")]
    HRESULT DoubleArray([in] SAFEARRAY(double)* array_to_set);
    
    [id(13), propget, helpstring("A Bunch Of Doubles")]
    HRESULT DoubleArray([out, retval] SAFEARRAY(double)* array_to_get);
    

    (i.e. the propput's made to match the propget, and is more like a propputref, really).

    If I have a double[] property in .NET, I get

    [id(13), propput, helpstring("A Bunch Of Doubles")]
    HRESULT DoubleArray([in] SAFEARRAY(double) array_to_set);
    
    [id(13), propget, helpstring("A Bunch Of Doubles")]
    HRESULT DoubleArray([out, retval] SAFEARRAY(double)* array_to_get);
    

    instead (i.e. no extra indirection in the setter).

    I seem to be unable to get the assembly to produce a typelib that includes this extra level of indirection; MarshalAs does not (seem to) support adding a VT_REF flag to VT_SAFEARRAY, nor can I find any other attribute that would let me do this.

    If I register the assembly, and then replace the typelib with one that has the extra *, the Marshaler errors out (claiming a SafeArray of some huge rank (e.g. 8600) is used, which is reasonable when misinterpreting the pointer).

    Alternatively, if I implement specific methods:

    [DispId(13), Description("A Bunch Of Doubles")]
    void set_DoubleArray([In] ref double[] value);
    
    [DispId(13), Description("A Bunch Of Doubles")]
    double[] get_DoubleArray();
    

    I do get the signatures I want (but not flagged as properties, and with the wrong dispid). Replacing the typelib with one that matches the original results in a different marshaling error: "SafeArray cannot be marshaled to this array type because it has either nonzero lower bounds or more than one dimension." In other words, issue #3 again; so this looks like it works, at least as well as any other method with a pointer-to-safearray.

Any insight into any of these issues (and #3 in particular) would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Sure, common problems. You made a huge laundry list out of them, pretty unlikely you'll find somebody willing to spend the hour or two to answer them. Several that have been asked before as well. Ask only one question at a time. –  Hans Passant Nov 18 '13 at 17:18
    
@Zastai, IMO, if you're really after 1:1 binary drop-in compatibility with VB6, you may want to create a thin adapter layer in unmanaged C++, to serve as bridge between C# and VB6. That might be more feasible than struggling to come up with some COM interop interfaces which in your case may end up being quite C#-unfriendly. –  Noseratio Nov 19 '13 at 2:39
    
@Noseratio Yeah, a C++ layer, either directly integrated with a C++/CLI doing the actual interop myself (if it is even possible to have a C++/CLI assembly and "pure" COM DLL in the same file), or a separate C++ COM DLL using a separate .NET assembly via interop, is looking like it will be the only possibility. –  Zastai Nov 20 '13 at 13:32

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