Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Minimum Example "Test.h":

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol CallBack <NSObject>

-(void)method;

@end

@interface Test : NSObject

-(void)callback:(CallBack*)theCallback;

@end

And the corresponding "Test.m":

#import "Test.h"

@implementation Test

-(void)callback:(CallBack*)theCallback
{
    [theCallback method];
}
@end

This will give me a "Expected a Type" error for the CallBack parameter both in the .m and the .h file. As the CallBack protocol is defined before everything else, i can't see why the compiler can't find it. If i add a Forward-Definition @class CallBack; at the beginning of the header file it will give me a "Receiver type 'CallBack' for instance message is a forward declaration" error for the line [theCallback method].

why can't the compiler find the protocol?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The correct syntax to refer to an object that conforms to the CallBack protocol is id<CallBack>.

Thus, you might want:

@protocol CallBack <NSObject>

-(void)method;

@end

@interface Test : NSObject

-(void)callback:(id <CallBack>)theCallback;

@end

and

@implementation Test

-(void)callback:(id <CallBack>)theCallback
{
    [theCallback method];
}
@end

For more information, see Working with Protocols in the Programming with Objective-C guide.

share|improve this answer
2  
Correct answer +1 –  Tirth Nov 18 '13 at 17:29
    
that's it. Thanks –  user3005567 Nov 18 '13 at 17:43
1  
Good answer. To extend it a bit: id<CallBack> means "any object that conforms to the CallBack protocol. You can also (unlike in some other OO languages) specify both class inheritance and protocol conformance in a type declaration: NSArray <CallBack> * means "any object whose class is (or inherits from) NSArray that also implements the CallBack protocol". –  rickster Nov 18 '13 at 23:11
    
why is the * not needed when i'm using id? It's still a pointer, isn't it? –  user3005567 Nov 19 '13 at 16:35
    
@user3005567 id is, by definition, a generic pointer to an object, so the * would be redundant. See the discussion of id down in this document: developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/…. BTW, you see this all the time in init methods that are generally defined as - (id) init; (i.e. a method that returns a pointer to an object) versus -(NSString *) someString; which explicitly returns a pointer to a string. –  Rob Nov 19 '13 at 17:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.