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This question is a sequel of a previous one but regarding this time the colormap and the order of the triangle. I want to interpolate experimental data over a surface so as to enable a continuous colormap with however the surface known only at its corner node. To interpolate, I put a canonical example which works quite well but fails on real data.

Indeed as shown in the example below, the initial triangulation results in two triangles with a huge gap between them, cf first picture. When the interpolation is done, it doesn't get any better and the colormap is also lost, cf. second picture. The best so far is by interverting z and y to get adjacent triangles from the beginning which results in a successful interpolation. However as you might notice in the third picture, the surface is tilted by 90° which is normal since I switch y for z and vice-versa.

However when I switch back y and z in the tri_surf function with ax.plot_trisurf(new.x, new_z, new.y, **kwargs), the colormap doesn't follow, cf. picture 4.

I thought of rotating the colormap in somehow or generate new triangles from the interpolated ones with triang = tri.Triangulation(new.x, new_z) but without any success. So any idea or hint about properly doing the initial triangulation with two adjacent triangles, as for the third picture, but with the surface oriented correclty and ultimately the colormap proportional to the Y-value.

import numpy
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import cm
import matplotlib.tri as tri

x=numpy.array([0.00498316, 0.00498316, 0.00996632, 0.00996632])
y=numpy.array([-0.00037677, -0.00027191, -0.00078681, -0.00088475])
z=numpy.array([0., -0.0049926, 0., -0.00744763])

# Initial Triangle    
fig = plt.figure()
ax = Axes3D(fig)
triang = tri.Triangulation(x, y)

norm = plt.Normalize(vmax=y.max(), vmin=y.min())
ax.plot_trisurf(x, y, z, triangles=triang.triangles)

# Interpolated Triangle
fig = plt.figure()
ax = Axes3D(fig)
triang = tri.Triangulation(x, y)
refiner = tri.UniformTriRefiner(triang)
interpolator = tri.LinearTriInterpolator(triang, z)
new, new_z = refiner.refine_field(z, interpolator, subdiv=4)

kwargs = dict(triangles=new.triangles, cmap=cm.jet, norm=norm, linewidth=0,     antialiased=False)
ax.plot_trisurf(new.x, new.y, new_z, **kwargs)

# Best so far
fig = plt.figure()
ax = Axes3D(fig)
triang = tri.Triangulation(x, z)
refiner = tri.UniformTriRefiner(triang)
interpolator = tri.LinearTriInterpolator(triang, y)
new, new_z = refiner.refine_field(y, interpolator, subdiv=4)

kwargs = dict(triangles=new.triangles, cmap=cm.jet, norm=norm, linewidth=0, antialiased=False)
ax.plot_trisurf(new.x, new.y, new_z, **kwargs)

plt.show()

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
You normalize the colormap based on y-limits; I think if you would normalize on z (this is the default) you'll get a pretty colormap.. What info do you like the colormap to show? –  moarningsun Nov 18 '13 at 19:57
    
The real data are the deformation of a wing near its resonance. The y axis is for me the most important data being the main deflection and thus my keydata... –  TazgerO Nov 18 '13 at 21:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apparently the automatic triangulation doesn't produce the right triangles for you, but you can specify how you want your triangles manually:

triang = tri.Triangulation(x, y, [[3,2,1],[1,2,0]])

# alternatively:
triang = tri.Triangulation(x, y, [[3,2,0],[1,3,0]])

These two ways give rather different results:

on the left: [[3,2,1],[1,2,0]], on the right: [[3,2,0],[1,3,0]]

However, now the interpolation becomes awkward, because for some (x,y) there are multiple z-values.. One way of bypassing this issue is interpolating and plotting the 2 large triangles separately:

import numpy
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import cm
import matplotlib.tri as tri


def plot_refined_tri(x, y, z, ax, subdiv=4, **kwargs):
    triang = tri.Triangulation(x, y)
    refiner = tri.UniformTriRefiner(triang)
    interpolator = tri.LinearTriInterpolator(triang, z)
    new, new_z = refiner.refine_field(z, interpolator, subdiv=subdiv)
    ax.plot_trisurf(new.x, new.y, new_z, triangles=new.triangles, **kwargs)


x=numpy.array([0.00498316, 0.00498316, 0.00996632, 0.00996632])
y=numpy.array([-0.00037677, -0.00027191, -0.00078681, -0.00088475])
z=numpy.array([0., -0.0049926, 0., -0.00744763])

fig = plt.figure()
ax = Axes3D(fig)
# note: I normalized on z-values to "fix" the colormap
norm = plt.Normalize(vmax=z.max(), vmin=z.min())
kwargs = kwargs = dict(linewidth=0.2, cmap=cm.jet, norm=norm)

idx = [3,2,1]
plot_refined_tri(x[idx], y[idx], z[idx], ax, **kwargs)

idx = [1,2,0]
plot_refined_tri(x[idx], y[idx], z[idx], ax, **kwargs)

plt.show()

Result:

This looks good

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was looking for... you rock! –  TazgerO Nov 18 '13 at 21:40
    
@TazgerO, do note in my code the colormap maps to the z-values not y-values! I'm not sure there is an easy way to apply a colormap to anything other than the z-axis..? (as you can do with plot_surface) –  moarningsun Nov 19 '13 at 1:14
    
@TazgerO, in the source of plot_trisurf there is actually this comment: "TODO: Support custom face colours". So I'm afraid mapping the color to the y-values will be difficult. –  moarningsun Nov 19 '13 at 1:23
    
If that so, I am going to apply the solution with 'Poly3DCollection' from Stefan in the previous one. It works but was frustrated that your solution wasn't worked due to the initial triangulation. –  TazgerO Nov 19 '13 at 7:26

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