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So I have to write this program which has to basicaly read string long few lines. Here's an example of string I need to check:

Let's say this is first line and let's check line 4
In this second line there are number 10 and 8
Third line doesn't have any numbers
This is fourth line and we'll go on in line 12
This is fifth line and we go on in line 8
In sixth line there is number 6
This seventh line contains number 5, which means 5th line
This is eighth and the last line, it ends here.
These three lines are boring.
They really are
In eleventh line we can see that line 12 is really interesting
This is twelfth line but we go back to line 7.

I need a function that will read first line. It'll find number 4 in it. This means nex line to check will line 4. In line 4 there is number 12. So it goes to line 12. There's number 7 so it goes to line 7. There's number 5, so 5th line, there's number 8 and so 8th line. In 8th line, there's no more numbers. So as a result I have to get number of line where there are no more numbers to go on. Also, if there are 2 numbers in 1 line it should acknowledge only the first one and this should be done by another function that I wrote:

def find_number(s):
    s = s.split()
    m = None
    for word in s:
        if word.isdigit():
            m = int(word)
            return word

So basicaly I need to use this function to solve the string with multiple lines.
So my question is how can I "jump" from one line to another by utilisting written function?

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1  
is there a question here? and can you show what you've tried so far? –  Corley Brigman Nov 18 '13 at 18:38
1  
unclear what are you asking. Please highlight the problem. –  SKJ Nov 18 '13 at 18:39
    
“utilising the written function”? You can’t, it simply doesn’t solve this problem. You need to write a different function. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 18 '13 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand your problem correctly (which I think I do, you stated it quite clearly), you want to find the first number in each line of a string, and then go to that line.

The first thing you need to do is split the string into lines with str.splitlines:

s = """Let's say this is first line and let's check line 4
In this second line there are number 10 and 8
Third line doesn't have any numbers
This is fourth line and we'll go on in line 12
This is fifth line and we go on in line 8
In sixth line there is number 6
This seventh line contains number 5, which means 5th line
This is eighth and the last line, it ends here.
These three lines are boring.
They really are
In eleventh line we can see that line 12 is really interesting
This is twelfth line but we go back to line 7."""

lines = s.splitlines()

Then you need to get the first integer in the first line. This is what your function does.

current_line = lines[0]
number = find_number(current_line)

Then you need to do the same thing, but with a different current_line. To get the next line, you might do this:

if number is None:     # No numbers were found
    end_line = current_line
else:
    current_line = lines[first_number]
    number = find_number(current_line)

You want do this over and over again, an indefinite number of times, so you need either a while loop, or recursion. This sounds like homework, so I won't give you the code for this (correct me if I'm wrong), you will have to work it out yourself. This shouldn't be too hard.

For future reference - a recursive solution:

def get_line(line):
    number = find_number(line)
    if number is None:     # No numbers were found
        return line
    else:
        return get_line(find_number(lines[number]))
share|improve this answer

I need a function that will read first line.

If you're using a list of lines, rather than a file, you don't need linecache at all; just list_of_lines[0] gets the first line.

If you're using a single long string, the splitlines method will turn it into a list of lines.

If you're using a file, you could read the whole file in: with open(filename) as f: list_of_lines = list(f). Or, the stdlib has a function, linecache.getline, that lets you get lines from a file in random-access order, without reading the whole thing into memory.

Whichever one you use, just remember that Python uses 0-based indices, not 1-based. So, to read the first line, you need linecache.getline(filename, 0).

I'll use linecache just to show that even the most complicated version of the problem still isn't very complicated. You should be able to adapt it yourself, if you don't need that.

It'll find number 4 in it. This means nex line to check will line 4.

Let's translate that logic into Python. You've already got the find_number function, and getline is the only other tricky part. So:

line = linecache.getline(filename, linenumber - 1)
linenumber = find_number(line)
if linenumber is None:
    # We're done
else:
    # We got a number.

In line 4 there is number 12. So it goes to line 12. There's number 7 so it goes to line 7. There's number 5, so 5th line, there's number 8 and so 8th line. In 8th line, there's no more numbers.

So you just need to loop until linenumber is None. You do that with a while statement:

linenumber = 1
while linenumber is not None:
    line = linecache.getline(filename, linenumber - 1)
    linenumber = find_number(line)

The only problem is that when linenumber is None, you want to be able to return the last linenumber, the one that pointed to None. That's easy:

linenumber = 1
while linenumber is not None:
    line = linecache.getline(filename, linenumber - 1)
    new_linenumber = find_number(line)
    if new_linenumber is None:
        return linenumber
    else:
        linenumber = new_linenumber

Of course once you've done that, you don't need to re-check the linenumber at the top of the loop, so you can just change it to while True:.

Now you just need to wrap this up in a function so it can get the starting values as parameters, and you're done.


However, it's worth noting that find_number doesn't quite work. While you do compute a number, m, you don't actually return m, you return something else. You'll need to fix that to get this all working.

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Here is my approach:

def check_line( line = None):
  assert(line != None )
  for word in line.split():
    if word.isdigit():
      return int(word)
  return -1  


next = 0

while next >= 0:
  last = next
  next = check_line(text[next]) -1
  if next >= 0:
    print "next line:", next +1
  else:
    print "The last line with number is:", last +1

Its not the most efficient in the world, but...

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