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I came across this question in a Facebook group. I know I should be using equals() method but I want to know why this is happening

class Main
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        String s1="abc:5";
        String s2="abc:5";
        System.out.println(s1==s2);
        System.out.println("s1 == s2 " + s1==s2);
    }
}

OUTPUT

true
false
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1  
i would expect the second line to print s1 == s2false –  Jeff Hawthorne Nov 18 '13 at 18:46
5  
System.out.println( ("s1 == s2 " + s1) == s2 ); –  Codo Nov 18 '13 at 18:46
    
@JeffHawthorne I would have, too! But it doesn't –  Daniel Kaplan Nov 18 '13 at 18:46
    
@JeffHawthorne I would expect any respectable Java compiler to cause the result of the statement to be true because "abc:5" is a static string compiled into the class and the generated byte code should simply load the symbol into two variables. You can also try new String("abc:5") != "abc:5" and new String("abc:5").intern() == "abc:5". The latter may or may not be true in Java 7 because intern() may keep the result in the heap instead of perm gen. –  billc.cn Dec 17 '13 at 22:31

8 Answers 8

This is due to operator precedence. '+' has a higher precedence than ==. You are actually comparing ("s1 == s2" + s1) to s2.

http://introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/11precedence/

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The confusion is in the order of operations. What is happening is that you're concatenating "s1 == s2 " and s1, then using == on that result and s2.

They are different objects, so false is printed (and "s1 == s2" is not printed). Put parentheses:

System.out.println("s1 == s2 " + (s1==s2));

This will print s1 == s2 true because both s1 and s2 refer to the same interned string literal, "abc:5".

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Oh I just make some change in the code and get that + first doing "s1 == s2 s1" then == with s2 which is not true. New code

class Main
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        String s1="abc:5";
        String s2="abc:5";
        System.out.println(s1==s2);
        System.out.println("s1 == s2 " + (s1==s2));
        System.out.println("s1 == s2 " + s1==s2);
    }
}

OUTPUT

true
s1 == s2 true
false
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this is easy to understand once you thought about it: the 2. println first adds "s1 == s2" and your string s1 and then compares it with s2, so it outputs false, because "s1 == s2abc:5" is not "abc:5"

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It is adding the strings "s1 == s2 " + s1 and then computing whether that is equal to s2. It is not so it is printing false.

The Java Operator Precedence might help you here.

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I think when using "==" the system will just check if the two things share the same location in the systems memory. However, if you use the ".equals" method the system will check if the two Strings share the same characters.

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Your code

    System.out.println(s1==s2);
    System.out.println("s1 == s2 " + s1==s2);

Since s1 and s2 are the same String literals

`s1==s2` is true

Thus the code can be written as

    System.out.println(true);   => true
    System.out.println("true" + s1==s2);

Now, "true" + s1==s2 is comprehended as ("true" + s1)==s2 due to higher precedence given to "+". Thus

"true"+s1 => trueabc:5 and
s2 => "abc:5"

Hence

    System.out.println("true" + s1==s2); => false
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I think its because of operator precedence of something like that, if you do System.out.println(""+(s1==s2));, it will print true.

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