Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

i'm trying to implement a custom version of an Observer pattern in c++.

These are my classes (just interface):

class Observer{
public:
    void observe(std::string behaviour, Observable * observable);
    void stopObserving(std::string behaviour, Observable * observable);
    virtual void notified(std::string behaviour, Observable * observed);
// ...
};

class Observable{
public:
    void notifyBehaviour(std::string behaviour);
    // ...
};

And can be used like this:

class A : public Observer{
public:
    void notified(std::string behaviour, Observable * observed){
        if (behaviour == "jumping"){
            // ...
        }
    }
};

class B : public Observable{
public:
    void jump(){
        // ...
        notifyBehaviour("jumping");
    }
};

int main(){
    A a;
    B b;
    a.observe("jumping", &b);
    b.jump();
    // ...
}

Each class implementing Observer can register itself as observing an Observable with a behaviour.

The Observable can notify its actions with "notifyBehaviour" to everyone interested.

Each Observer listening will be notified via its method "notified".

The above works perfectly. Anyway in the example above:

void notified(std::string behaviour, Observable * observed){
    if (behaviour == "jumping"){
    // ...
}

i'd like to use the Observable * i'm passing to do something on the notifying object. Unfortunately i'll have to do something like this:

void notified(std::string behaviour, Observable * observed){
    if (behaviour == "jumping"){
        auto pointer = dynamic_cast<B *>(observed);
        if (pointer)
            pointer->doSomethingElse();
    }
}

That's ugly and will probably create problems. For example observing two different jumping entities will need multiple castings waiting for the right one.

My question is: is it possible to pass some RTTI or call an overloaded function or a template having already the right object type? I'd like to have:

class A : public Observer{
public:
    void notified(std::string behaviour, B * observed){
        if (behaviour == "jumping"){
            observed->doSomethingBlike();
            // observed if of type B !
        }
    }
    void notified(std::string behaviour, C * observed){
        if (behaviour == "jumping"){
            observed->doSomethingClike();
            // observed if of type C !
        }
    }
};

so i just need to implement the various object types i'd like to listen.

I've tried with inheritance, templates, boost::any but still without luck.

Thanks for ideas.

share|improve this question
1  
Not a complete answer, but one option would be to make Observer a template, with the notified member function taking a pointer to the correct type. So then your final example would be class A: public Observer<B>, Observer<C> { ... . – Dave S Nov 18 '13 at 20:34
    
Templates aren't good for this case. The Observed class needs to be generic - a base class of all observed classes. Using templates you give them different base classes. – egur Nov 18 '13 at 20:46
    
Dave S, that worked! Thanks a lot. If you commit an answer i'll accept it.. I have to do something like class A: public Observer<B> and class B: public Observed<B>.. I think there's also more static type checks which is a big plus – Luke Givens Nov 19 '13 at 10:36

Declare a pure virtual method in the Observed class. Or just an empty virtual function so there's no need to override.

class Observed {
public:
    virtual ~Observed();
    Observed();
    virtual void DoSomethingElse() {} // OR
    //void DoSomethingElse() = NULL;

    // rest of class

};
share|improve this answer

I have done this recently in a couple of projects. The basic idea:

I created a base class (Notified) that has a virtual method for each interface you wish to receive:

class Notified
{
public:
   virtual bool Notify(NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType, uint32 value)
   { return false; };
   virtual bool Notify(NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType, ITEM_ID_T value)
   { return false; };
   virtual bool Notify(NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType, const string& value)
   { return false; };
   virtual ~Notified(); 
};

I created a singleton to act as a central point to hold which things you want to send messages to (derived from Notified) and methods to call them:

    class Notifier : public SingletonDynamic<Notifier>
     {

         private:
            ... detail omitted...

         public:

            virtual void Reset();
            virtual bool Init() { Reset(); return true; }
            virtual void Shutdown() { Reset(); }

            void Attach(Notified* observer, NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType);
            // Detach for a specific event
            void Detach(Notified* observer, NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType);
            // Detach for ALL events
            void Detach(Notified* observer);

            // This template function (defined in the header file) allows you to
            // add interfaces to Notified easily and call them as needed.  Variants
            // will be generated at compile time by this template.

            template <typename T>
            bool Notify(NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType, const T& value)
            {
              ...detail omitted
            }



            /* Used for CPPUnit.  Could create a Mock...maybe...but this seems
             * like it will get the job done with minimal fuss.  For now.
             */
            // Return all events that this object is registered for.
            vector<NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T> GetEvents(Notified* observer);
            // Return all objects registered for this event.
            vector<Notified*> GetNotified(NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T event);
         };

It is tempting to try and make a template method for the Notified class:

template <typename T>
virtual bool Notify(NOTIFIED_EVENT_TYPE_T eventType, const T& value)

But you cannot because it needs to be virtual so you can have your derived class handle it. I thought about digging deeper into doing it as a template (meta template stuff), but I think that would confuse an otherwise generally simple to use and understandable design.

The main point of this design is:
1. You get complete type safety calling your Notified derived classes, checked directly through the compile process. 2. If you don't implement a handler for your function, you can have the Notifier class throw an exception when you return false. 3. Writing code for each handler in a Notified derived class is trivial:

   class MyNotified : public Notified
    {
        virtual bool Notified(NOTIFIED_EVENT_T evt, uint32 value)
        {
          bool result = true;
          switch(evt)
          {
          case EVT_1:
              ...do something...
              break;
          default:
              result = false;
          }
          return result;
        }
   };

I have examples of this in (in various stages of life) in posts found here.

Was this helpful?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.