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This question is actually more specific than the topic but I think the topic covers generally what I want to know.

I was reviewing a bit of code from a project that looks like something I would want use and I saw something that kind of interested me because I wasn't sure why it was done. Specifically, in ActionBar-PullToRefresh by Chris Banes I saw this in a .java:

package uk.co.senab.actionbarpulltorefresh.library;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.res.Configuration;
import android.view.View;

/**
* HeaderTransformers are what controls and update the Header View to reflect the current state
* of the pull-to-refresh interaction. They are responsible for showing and hiding the header
* view, as well as update the state.
*/
public abstract class HeaderTransformer {

   /**
  * Called whether the header view has been inflated from the resources
 * defined in {@link Options#headerLayout}.
 *
 * @param activity The {@link android.app.Activity} that the header view is attached to.
 * @param headerView The inflated header view.
 */
public void onViewCreated(Activity activity, View headerView) {}

/**
 * Called when the header should be reset. You should update any child
 * views to reflect this.
 * <p/>
 * You should <strong>not</strong> change the visibility of the header
 * view.
 */
public void onReset() {}

/**
 * Called the user has pulled on the scrollable view.
 *
 * @param percentagePulled value between 0.0f and 1.0f depending on how far the
 *                         user has pulled.
 */
public void onPulled(float percentagePulled) {}

/**
 * Called when a refresh has begun. Theoretically this call is similar
 * to that provided from {@link uk.co.senab.actionbarpulltorefresh.library.listeners.OnRefreshListener} but is more suitable
 * for header view updates.
 */
public void onRefreshStarted() {}

/**
 * Called when a refresh can be initiated when the user ends the touch
 * event. This is only called when {@link Options#refreshOnUp} is set to
 * true.
 */
public void onReleaseToRefresh() {}

/**
 * Called when the current refresh has taken longer than the time
 * specified in {@link Options#refreshMinimizeDelay}.
 */
public void onRefreshMinimized() {}

/**
 * Called when the Header View should be made visible, usually with an animation.
 *
 * @return true if the visibility has changed.
 */
public abstract boolean showHeaderView();

/**
 * Called when the Header View should be made invisible, usually with an animation.
 *
 * @return true if the visibility has changed.
 */
public abstract boolean hideHeaderView();

/**
 * Called when the Activity's configuration has changed.
 *
 * @param activity The {@link android.app.Activity} that the header view is attached to.
 * @param newConfig New configuration.
 *
 * @see android.app.Activity#onConfigurationChanged(android.content.res.Configuration)
 */
public void onConfigurationChanged(Activity activity, Configuration newConfig) {}
}

My question with this file is why do an abstract class here instead of an interface or what is the purpose of doing an abstract class at all? I see that the class has two abstract methods. My understanding is that the abstract method must be defined in a sub class or else that sub class is also an abstract class right? So is this done as an abstract class so as to mandate the implementation of those two abstract methods only? Is that the only reason to do an abstract class instead of an interface here?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There could be numerous reasons for making it an abstract class, some of which you pointed out yourself.

My guess in this case, is because it's a library. Lets say you have a huge application, and use this class to define many other classes.

If the class would get updated by adding a new method, your code wouldn't compile if it was a interface, because your code violates the 'contract' of an interface (it isn't implementing all the methods). But in this case, it's an abstract class, which can define a default behavior: in this case, doing nothing. So your application wouldn't break, and compile without any issues.

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The main advantage is probably that you only have to implement the methods that are necessary for your subclass, whereas an interface would require you to implement every method, even if your implementation is empty.

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The reason to use something abstract (interfaces are) is to be able to define abstract methods. The reason this is not an interface, though, is to be ableto define optional methods.

The following construct, for example

public void onReset() {}

defines (conceptually) an almost-abstract method, that has a default no-op implementation.

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