Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an MVC 4.0 site which is using the BCL async/await package. To preserve HttpContext across the initial thread and the subsequent thread (after the await) I began by creating a closure with a reference to the context like so:

   public async Task<ViewResult> GetCustomer(int id)
      {            
       var ctx =  HttpContext.Current;
       ctx["test"] = "test";

       await DoSomeLongRunningIO();

       var test = ctx["test"];
       //do other things with context

       return View();
    }

However, I need to call various services after the await. These legacy services call the HttpContext.Current directly. So I approached this with the following code, which seemed like a simple way to ensure these services still work as expected.

  public async Task<ViewResult> GetCustomer(int id)
      {            
       var ctx =  HttpContext.Current;

       await DoSomeLongRunningIO();

       HttpContext.Current = ctx;

       //call other services which use static references to httpcontext
       return View();
    }

This does work, however I have been reading this answer that suggests it is a bad idea:

  1. Is this a bad idea, and if so why is it worse than the first example?

Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you aware that async/await in an ASP.NET app on .NET 4.0 is undefined?

If you upgrade to .NET 4.5, you'll find that HttpContext is preserved automatically for you. There's no need for closures or to set it.

Setting HttpContext.Current is a bad idea, because you're bypassing the ASP.NET safety checks that ensure there is only one thread at a time with that context.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply. when we say undefined, what does that mean? (i did read the link but was unclear). I cant use 4.5 at the moment unfortunately. From my code above, I didnt think I would ever be in a position where I have 2 threads with one context at one time? It would always be 1 thread and 1 context (at any one time). –  jonho Nov 19 '13 at 19:12
1  
@jonho: "Undefined" is shorthand for "undefined behavior". That means it won't work right. –  Stephen Cleary Nov 19 '13 at 19:49
    
I have decided to use the TPL instead. –  jonho Nov 20 '13 at 18:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.