Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What the code is supposed to do:

  1. Get user input (amount of car loan)
  2. Have user click on button
  3. Spit out monthly car pmt

Here is the code:

<script type="text/javascript"> 
  var myObject = {
      myFunction: function(){
          return document.getElementById("carDebt");     
      },
      h: function(){
          var carLoan=myFunction();
          var RATE12 = 0.005;
          var TIMERATE = 0.25862780376;
          return Math.round((carLoan * RATE12) / TIMERATE);     
      }
      writeIt: function(){
          var g = myObject.h();
          var xyz = g;
          var abc = 2;
          var efg = 3;
          var somearray = [xyz,abc,efg];
          var z = 0;
          for (i=0; i<somearray.length; i++) {
              z += somearray[i]; 
          }; 
          document.getElementById("result").innerHTML=z;        
      }
  };
</script>
<body>
  <form>
    Amt Due on Car Loan: <input type="number" id="carDebt">
  </form>
  <form>
    <input type="button" onclick="myObject.writeIt()" value="Click here when done"      id="button1">
  </form>
  <p id="result">Results Here</p>
</body>

I am not getting anything, as in, not even NaN or undefined. I am probably missing something obvious but I have tried a thousand different ways!

share|improve this question
    
I am not sure why all the code is squished together. I have copied and pasted multiple times and it keeps putting everything on the same lines. – HST Nov 19 '13 at 0:15
    
i edited it to fix it – Markasoftware Nov 19 '13 at 0:16
3  
You're missing a comma after your h() function. – Cᴏʀʏ Nov 19 '13 at 0:16
    
where's the elt with id result? – Markasoftware Nov 19 '13 at 0:17
    
Thanks, Cory. I added the comma but it's still not working. – HST Nov 19 '13 at 0:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This line might be the culprit:

var carLoan=myFunction();

Try referencing the object it's under instead:

var carLoan = myObject.myFunction();

Furthermore, that function is returning the DOM element rather than the value of the DOM element. You'll probably want to edit the function to return the value:

myFunction: function(){
   return document.getElementById("carDebt").value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
YAY! That worked! Thanks. – HST Nov 19 '13 at 0:29

I also noticed that you have what appears to be too many tags. Do you mean to have two "forms"?

share|improve this answer
    
This wouldn't cause an issue given his code, even though it doesn't appear to be needed. – Matt Huggins Nov 19 '13 at 0:20
    
That is true, I just wanted to bring it up because I am pretty sure that it will cause an issue with using the button once this issue is cleared up. – morantis Nov 19 '13 at 0:23
    
I'm still learning, so I thought I needed two forms. But thanks for bringing it up. – HST Nov 19 '13 at 0:25
1  
In your case it will work fine, because the button is calling a function that then uses the other "form" for data. In other form situations, such as sending data to another page, those will act as separate forms and no data will follow the button click to the next page, if that makes any sense. – morantis Nov 19 '13 at 0:34

Seems the answers are in already putting together the above, ie fix typo, get value not element, have a "result" element to output to. I also added "this" to the myFunction call. My version:

<script type="text/javascript">
 var myObject = 
{ 
    myFunction: function()
        { 
            return document.getElementById("carDebt").value;            
        }, 
    h: function()
        { 
            var carLoan = this.myFunction(); 
            var RATE12 = 0.005; 
            var TIMERATE = 0.25862780376; 
            return Math.round((carLoan * RATE12) / TIMERATE); 
        },
    writeIt: function()
        { 
            var g = myObject.h(); 
            var xyz = g; 
            var abc = 2; 
            var efg = 3; 
            var somearray = [xyz,abc,efg]; 
            var z = 0; 
            for(i=0; i<somearray.length; i++)
            { 
                z += somearray[i]; 
            }; 
            document.getElementById("result").innerHTML=z; 
        } 
}; 
</script> 
</head>
<body> 
<form> Amt Due on Car Loan: <input type="number" id="carDebt"> </form> 
<form> <input type="button" onclick="myObject.writeIt()" value="Click here when done" id="button1"> </form>
<div><p id="result"></p></div>

</body>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I would upvote these suggestions but I don't have enough reputation points yet. Sorry. – HST Nov 19 '13 at 19:25
    
Question: I don't really understand "this" very well. What is the value of "this" - not having to type out "myObject"?? Also, I can do: var carLoan=this.myFunction(), BUT NOT <input type="button" onclick="this.writeIt()" - right? "This" only works strictly within the script, can't be used in HTML at all?? – HST Nov 19 '13 at 19:41
    
Answer: Not an easy one. My attempt to explain is this references the instance or object that is active at the time it is used. Yes, this is interchangeable with myObject as I used it. But no the same does not work within the <input> tag - in this context this refers to the <input> element object, so this.writeIt is meaningless. See discussion on this for c# here which may help. – alwaysLearning Nov 25 '13 at 1:03
    
Thanks, alwaysLearning. I have been trying to figure "this" out for some time. – HST Dec 1 '13 at 16:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.