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I have a few lines that are broken and I want those lines to be moved up to the prior line

I need help to fix this file text Source:

    Path   : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::\\eiesc1\Ser
             vice_Legal 
    Access : BUILTIN\Administrators Allow  FullControl
             MLIDDOMAIN1\Domain Admins Allow  FullControl
             MLIDDOMAIN1\acl_corp_gs_legal Allow  Modify, Synchronize
    -----------------------
    Path   : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::\\eiesc1\balco 
    Access : Everyone Allow  FullControl
             Everyone Allow  268435456
    -----------------------
    Path   : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::\\eiesc1\BCDRP
             lanning 
    Access : Everyone Allow  FullControl
             Everyone Allow  268435456
    -----------------------

Expected result:

    Path   : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::\\eiesc1\Service_Legal 
    Access : BUILTIN\Administrators Allow  FullControl
    -----------------------
    Path   : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::\\eiesc1\balco 
    Access : Everyone Allow  FullControl
             Everyone Allow  268435456
    -----------------------
    Path   : Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::\\eiesc1\BCDRPlanning 
    Access : Everyone Allow  FullControl
             Everyone Allow  268435456
    -----------------------

I only was able to run awk "/Path/{a=1;next}/Access/{a=0}a" to find which are the lines that are broken, but I do not know how to move those lines up.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
sed '/^Path/{N;s/\n         //;}'
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Magical, thank you so much –  Eduardo Nov 19 '13 at 3:08
    
Oddly enough, when I tried this I found two problems. First, Path does not appear to be right at the start of the string (in the example file there was white space before); and this leaves some space in between the lines. Both may be caused by unwanted spaces introduced in the copy/paste operation. How would you modify this to work with leading spaces on each line? –  Floris Nov 19 '13 at 3:12
    
@Floris: how many leading spaces on each line? –  Beta Nov 19 '13 at 3:27
    
I was going to leave the answer as "variable". Can that be done? A simple thing like [ ]+ instead of the fixed string of spaces didn't seem to work... –  Floris Nov 19 '13 at 3:31
    
Your sed might not accept + ... Try * or maybe \+. –  tripleee Nov 19 '13 at 4:42
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You want to hold off on printing your Path lines until you've seen the next line and if the next line isn't an Access line then you want to print the two lines together.

Something like:

/Path/ {
    a=$0
    next
}

a && !/Access/ {
    gsub(/^ */, "")
    printf "%s",a
    print
    a=""
    next
}

1
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Would this work if the path was broken across more than one line? It was not explicit from the question but it looks like it would be possible... –  Floris Nov 19 '13 at 3:02
    
Not as written. You could make it do that by continuing to accumulate into a though and only printing when you saw Access. –  Etan Reisner Nov 19 '13 at 3:48
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