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I've seen a lot of projects using v1.2.3 as the naming convention for tags in git. I've also seen some use 1.2.3. Is there an officially endorsed style, or are there any good arguments for using either?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Cupcake, rink.attendant.6, Carpetsmoker, random, Reto Koradi Jun 29 '14 at 1:31

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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With 43 upvotes and counting, I am wondering if this very valuable question could be reworded and reopened, with some answer integrating all the points in a nice summary and being at the top? @PeterEisentraut's seems to be the most complete; whereas the accepted answer ATM seems a bit misleading. (I think I will be using v1.2.3 for tags myself, after reading all the points.) –  HostileFork Nov 22 '14 at 2:56

9 Answers 9

up vote 54 down vote accepted

There is Semantic Versioning, by Tom Preston-Werner of github fame:

Tagging Specification (SemVerTag)

This sub-specification SHOULD be used if you use a version control system (Git, Mercurial, SVN, etc) to store your code. Using this system allows automated tools to inspect your package and determine SemVer compliance and released versions.

  1. When tagging releases in a version control system, the tag for a version MUST be "vX.Y.Z" e.g. "v3.1.0".
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Thanks - That's very close. I wish he would have qualified why the v should be there though. –  troelskn Jan 6 '10 at 9:25
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@troelskn @mojombo == Tom Preston-Werner –  peritus Jan 6 '10 at 10:27
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Updated link: github.com/mojombo/semver.org/issues/1 –  Josh Lee May 4 '11 at 16:15
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Semantic Versioning 1.0.0 uses format "v1.2.3". Semantic Versioning 2.0.0-rc.1 probably uses format "1.2.3". Tagging Specification (SemVerTag) article was removed from specs. More here: semver.org –  petrnohejl Jan 29 '13 at 10:34
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This answer is done when existed old semver (version 1.0). Nowadays the prefix 'v' removed from semver v2.0. For details see post below. –  vitalii May 19 at 9:17

There appear to be two dominating conventions (assuming you also abide by some reasonable standard for numbering the releases themselves):

  • v1.2.3
  • 1.2.3

The advantages of v1.2.3 are that the Git documentation (and also the Mercurial documentation) uses that format in its examples, and that several "authorities" such as the Linux kernel, Git itself, and the mentioned Semantic Versioning use it.

The advantages of 1.2.3 are that gitweb or GitHub can automatically offer a tarball or zip download of the form packagename-$tag.tar.gz (and I think it's quite established that a tarball should not be named package-v1.2.3.tar.gz). Alternatively, you can use git describe directly to generate tarball version numbers. For lightweight projects without a formal release process, these possibilities can be quite convenient. It should also be noted that Semantic Versioning is by no means the only or a universally accepted standard for version numbering. And notable projects such as GNOME as well as countless other projects do use the 1.2.3 tag naming.

I think it's probably too late to consolidate these positions. As always, be consistent and make sense.

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Nice, interesting points –  MestreLion May 12 '12 at 12:07

The reason for the preceding 'v' is historical. Older SCCS (cvs,rcs) could not distinguish between a tag identifier and a revision number. Tag identifiers were restricted to not begin with a numeric value so that revision numbers could be detected.

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+1: Good first answer and a name from one of my favourite books :-) Perhaps your next answer will be on a more current question, though. –  Johnsyweb Jun 8 '11 at 12:58
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... but if this is only true for older SVCS, what if the point of this answer for a question about modern Git? –  MestreLion May 12 '12 at 12:09
    
this is still useful in git, so you can easily distinguish version tags, from other type of tags (tags are useful for many other things) –  Benja Mar 5 '13 at 13:01

Not that I know of.
But Git will not allow a tag and a branch of the same name at the same time, so if you have a branch "1.1" for 1.1 works, do not put a tag "1.1", use for instance "v1.1"

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We use branches and tags for release-specific work followed by the actual release, respectively:

o---o-----o---o---o--- ...   master
     \   /       /
      \ /       /
       o-------o--- ...      1.6 branch

Every developer makes a mental decision about whether the work they're about to commit is applicable just to master or if it's also relevant to the branch. You can see that changes that are made to the branch are merged back on master, but some changes on master will never go on the branch (that is, those not intended for the 1.6 release, in this example).

When we're ready to release, we tag it and then merge back one last time, and we name the tag with the same name as the branch, but with an extra identifier about what particular version it is, e.g. "1.6-release" or "1.6-beta" or "1.6-rc2", et cetera.

... ------o---o---o--o---o--- ...   master
         /       /
        /       /
... ---o------(*)--- ...      1.6 branch
          1.6-release
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Thanks - that's a good answer for describing how you do branching, but I actually just meant if there were some specific (technical) reason for using a certain naming scheme in git. Still giving you an upvote for the nice diagrams though ;) –  troelskn Jan 5 '10 at 18:52
    
Ah, gotcha! Sorry for misunderstanding your question. No, there's no specific technical reason for using a particular name, other than human communication. You can name your branches and tags pretty much whatever you like. –  John Feminella Jan 5 '10 at 19:37

New package managers advice to tag versions without prefix v (like composer for PHP projects). SemVer 2.0 has nothing about tag specification. It's done intentionally due avoiding conflicts. However it's advised to add prefix v in documentation and text references. As example format v1.0.4 instead of full version 1.0.4 or ver. 1.0.4 is enough verbose and elegant in documentation.

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I don't know of any standards. I simply choose my tag names such that I can stick a

VERSION = `git describe`

in my build scripts. So, the tag naming convention actually depends on the version naming convention of the project.

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There is no one best practice I'm aware of. Here are some links:

Generally, versioning (0.0.1, v0.2.1, ...) maybe hand in hand with some issue-tracking could be considered a plausible approach. (.. although I usually use v-prefixed tag names .. see also @VonC answer)

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The version tag specification is defined in http://semver.org/

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