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What's the easiest, tersest, and most flexible method or library for parsing Python command line arguments?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 51 down vote accepted

This answer suggests optparse which is appropriate for older Python versions. For Python 2.7 and above, argparse replaces optparse. See this answer for more information.

As other people pointed out, you are better off going with optparse over getopt. getopt is pretty much a one-to-one mapping of the standard getopt(3) C library functions, and not very easy to use.

optparse, while being a bit more verbose, is much better structured and simpler to extend later on.

Here's a typical line to add an option to your parser:

parser.add_option('-q', '--query',
            action="store", dest="query",
            help="query string", default="spam")

It pretty much speaks for itself; at processing time, it will accept -q or --query as options, store the argument in an attribute called query and has a default value if you don't specify it. It is also self-documenting in that you declare the help argument (which will be used when run with -h/--help) right there with the option.

Usually you parse your arguments with:

options, args = parser.parse_args()

This will, by default, parse the standard arguments passed to the script (sys.argv[1:])

options.query will then be set to the value you passed to the script.

You create a parser simply by doing

parser = optparse.OptionParser()

These are all the basics you need. Here's a complete Python script that shows this:

import optparse

parser = optparse.OptionParser()

parser.add_option('-q', '--query',
    action="store", dest="query",
    help="query string", default="spam")

options, args = parser.parse_args()

print 'Query string:', options.query

5 lines of python that show you the basics.

Save it in sample.py, and run it once with

python sample.py

and once with

python sample.py --query myquery

Beyond that, you will find that optparse is very easy to extend. In one of my projects, I created a Command class which allows you to nest subcommands in a command tree easily. It uses optparse heavily to chain commands together. It's not something I can easily explain in a few lines, but feel free to browse around in my repository for the main class, as well as a class that uses it and the option parser

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4  
@Silfheed's suggestion of argparse seems even better. code.google.com/p/argparse –  hayalci Jun 26 '09 at 11:54
3  
This answer is wonderfully clear and easy to follow -- for python 2.3 thru 2.6. For python 2.7+ it is not the best answer as argparse is now part of the standard library and optparse deprecrated. –  matt wilkie Feb 28 '11 at 19:47

The new hip way is argparse for these reasons. argparse > optparse > getopt

update: As of py2.7 argparse is part of the standard library and optparse is deprecated.

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Pretty much everybody is using getopt

Here is the example code for the doc :

import getopt, sys

def main():
    try:
        opts, args = getopt.getopt(sys.argv[1:], "ho:v", ["help", "output="])
    except getopt.GetoptError:
        # print help information and exit:
        usage()
        sys.exit(2)
    output = None
    verbose = False
    for o, a in opts:
        if o == "-v":
            verbose = True
        if o in ("-h", "--help"):
            usage()
            sys.exit()
        if o in ("-o", "--output"):
            output = a

So in a word, here is how it works.

You've got two types of options. Those who are receiving arguments, and those who are just like switches.

sys.argv is pretty much your char** argv in C. Like in C you skip the first element which is the name of your program and parse only the arguments : sys.argv[1:]

Getopt.getopt will parse it according to the rule you give in argument.

"ho:v" here describes the short arguments : -ONELETTER. The : means that -o accepts one argument.

Finally ["help", "output="] describes long arguments ( --MORETHANONELETTER ). The = after output once again means that output accepts one arguments.

The result is a list of couple (option,argument)

If an option doesn't accept any argument (like --help here) the arg part is an empty string. You then usually want to loop on this list and test the option name as in the example.

I hope this helped you.

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With the deprecation of getopt in newer versions of Python this answer has gone out of date. –  shuttle87 Jul 16 at 17:37

Since 2012 Python has a very easy, powerful and really cool module for argument parsing called docopt. It works with Python from 2.5 to 3.3 and needs no installation. Here is an example taken from it's documentation:

"""Naval Fate.

Usage:
  naval_fate.py ship new <name>...
  naval_fate.py ship <name> move <x> <y> [--speed=<kn>]
  naval_fate.py ship shoot <x> <y>
  naval_fate.py mine (set|remove) <x> <y> [--moored | --drifting]
  naval_fate.py (-h | --help)
  naval_fate.py --version

Options:
  -h --help     Show this screen.
  --version     Show version.
  --speed=<kn>  Speed in knots [default: 10].
  --moored      Moored (anchored) mine.
  --drifting    Drifting mine.

"""
from docopt import docopt


if __name__ == '__main__':
    arguments = docopt(__doc__, version='Naval Fate 2.0')
    print(arguments)

So this is it: one line of code plus your doc string which is essential. I told you it's cool -- didn't I ;-)

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Use optparse which comes with the standard library. Here's a link describing how to use it:

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-pythocli/

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Just in case you might need to, this may help if you need to grab unicode arguments on Win32 (2K, XP etc):


from ctypes import *

def wmain(argc, argv):
    print argc
    for i in argv:
        print i
    return 0

def startup():
    size = c_int()
    ptr = windll.shell32.CommandLineToArgvW(windll.kernel32.GetCommandLineW(), byref(size))
    ref = c_wchar_p * size.value
    raw = ref.from_address(ptr)
    args = [arg for arg in raw]
    windll.kernel32.LocalFree(ptr)
    exit(wmain(len(args), args))
startup()
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Thank you. This script helped me work out some really complicated quoting I needed to do when passing startup commands to GVim. –  telotortium Apr 11 '13 at 21:20

I prefer optparse to getopt. It's very declarative: you tell it the names of the options and the effects they should have (e.g., setting a boolean field), and it hands you back a dictionary populated according to your specifications.

http://docs.python.org/lib/module-optparse.html

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I think the best way for larger projects is optparse, but if you are looking for an easy way, maybe http://werkzeug.pocoo.org/documentation/script is something for you.

from werkzeug import script

# actions go here
def action_foo(name=""):
    """action foo does foo"""
    pass

def action_bar(id=0, title="default title"):
    """action bar does bar"""
    pass

if __name__ == '__main__':
    script.run()

So basically every function action_* is exposed to the command line and a nice help message is generated for free.

python foo.py 
usage: foo.py <action> [<options>]
       foo.py --help

actions:
  bar:
    action bar does bar

    --id                          integer   0
    --title                       string    default title

  foo:
    action foo does foo

    --name                        string
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The title doesn't say it all :)


best != easiest and tersest


I think the best way is the optparse way but that's certainly not the tersest ;)

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This answer is no longer valid with docopt. =) –  techtonik Jun 2 '13 at 15:57

Check out commandlineapp. It makes things a lot easier to handle imo. http://blog.doughellmann.com/2008/06/commandlineapp-30.html

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consoleargs deserves to be mentioned here. It is very easy to use. Check it out:

from consoleargs import command

@command
def main(url, name=None):
  """
  :param url: Remote URL 
  :param name: File name
  """
  print """Downloading url '%r' into file '%r'""" % (url, name)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  main()

Now in console:

% python demo.py --help
Usage: demo.py URL [OPTIONS]

URL:    Remote URL 

Options:
    --name -n   File name

% python demo.py http://www.google.com/
Downloading url ''http://www.google.com/'' into file 'None'

% python demo.py http://www.google.com/ --name=index.html
Downloading url ''http://www.google.com/'' into file ''index.html''
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