Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was having a discussion with a teammate about locking in .NET. He's a really bright guy with an extensive background in both lower-level and higher-level programming, but his experience with lower level programming far exceeds mine. Anyway, He argued that .NET locking should be avoided on critical systems expected to be under heavy-load if at all possible in order to avoid the admittedly small possibility of a "zombie thread" crashing a system. I routinely use locking and I didn't know what a "zombie thread" was, so I asked. The impression I got from his explanation is that a zombie thread is a thread that has terminated but somehow still holds onto some resources. An example he gave of how a zombie thread could break a system was a thread begins some procedure after locking on some object, and then is at some point terminated before the lock can be released. This situation has the potential to crash the system, because eventually, attempts to execute that method will result in the threads all waiting for access to an object that will never be returned, because the thread that is using the locked object is dead.

I think I got the gist of this, but if I'm off base, please let me know. The concept made sense to me. I wasn't completely convinced that this was a real scenario that could happen in .NET. I've never previously heard of "zombies", but I do recognize that programmers who have worked in depth at lower levels tend to have a deeper understanding of computing fundamentals (like threading). I definitely do see the value in locking, however, and I have seen many world class programmers leverage locking. I also have limited ability to evaluate this for myself because I know that the lock(obj) statement is really just syntactic sugar for:

bool lockWasTaken = false;
var temp = obj;
try { Monitor.Enter(temp, ref lockWasTaken); { body } }
finally { if (lockWasTaken) Monitor.Exit(temp); }

and because Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit are marked extern. It seems conceivable that .NET does some kind of processing that protects threads from exposure to system components that could have this kind of impact, but that is purely speculative and probably just based on the fact that I've never heard of "zombie threads" before. So, I'm hoping I can get some feedback on this here:

  1. Is there a clearer definition of a "zombie thread" than what I've explained here?
  2. Can zombie threads occur on .NET? (Why/Why not?)
  3. If applicable, How could I force the creation of a zombie thread in .NET?
  4. If applicable, How can I leverage locking without risking a zombie thread scenario in .NET?
share|improve this question
7  
are you sure your co-mate does not talk about deadlocking?? –  Andreas Niedermair Nov 19 '13 at 8:04
8  
@AndreasNiedermair - I know what deadlocking is and it was clearly not a matter of misuse of that terminology. Deadlocking was mentioned in the conversation and was clearly distinct from a "zombie thread". To me, the main distinction is that a dead lock has a two-way un-resolvable dependency whereas zombie thread is one-way, and requires a terminated process. If you disagree and think there's a better way to look at these things, please explain –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 8:11
12  
I think the term "zombie" actually comes from a UNIX backgound, as in "zombie process", right??? There is a clear definition of a "zombie process" in UNIX: it describes a child process that has terminated but where the parent of the child process still needs to "release" the child process (and it's resources) by calling wait or waitpid. The child process is then called a "zombie process". See also howtogeek.com/119815 –  hogliux Nov 19 '13 at 11:20
7  
If part of your program crashes, leaving the program in an undefined state, then of course that can cause problems with the rest of your program. The same thing can happen if you improperly handle exceptions in a single-threaded program. The problem isn't with threads, the problem is that you have global mutable state and that you're not properly handling unexpected thread termination. Your "really bright" coworker is totally off base on this one. –  Jim Mischel Nov 19 '13 at 16:23
6  
"Ever since the first computers, there have always been ghosts in the machine. Random segments of code that have grouped together to form unexpected protocols..." –  Chris Laplante Nov 19 '13 at 19:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 197 down vote accepted
  • Is there a clearer definition of a "zombie thread" than what I've explained here?

Seems like a pretty good explanation to me - a thread that has terminated (and can therefore no longer release any resources), but whose resources (e.g. handles) are still around and (potentially) causing problems.

  • Can zombie threads occur on .NET? (Why/Why not?)
  • If applicable, How could I force the creation of a zombie thread in .NET?

They sure do, look, I made one!

[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
private static extern void ExitThread(uint dwExitCode);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    new Thread(Target).Start();
    Console.ReadLine();
}

private static void Target()
{
    using (var file = File.Open("test.txt", FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
    {
        ExitThread(0);
    }
}

This program starts a thread Target which opens a file and then immediately kills itself using ExitThread. The resulting zombie thread will never release the handle to the "test.txt" file and so the file will remain open until the program terminates (you can check with process explorer or similar). The handle to "test.txt" won't be released until GC.Collect is called - it turns out it is even more difficult than I thought to create a zombie thread that leaks handles)

  • If applicable, How can I leverage locking without risking a zombie thread scenario in .NET?

Don't do what I just did!

As long as your code cleans up after itself correctly (use Safe Handles or equivalent classes if working with unmanaged resources), and as long as you don't go out of your way to kill threads in weird and wonderful ways (safest way is just to never kill threads - let them terminate themselves normally, or through exceptions if necessary), the only way that you are going to have something resembling a zombie thread is if something has gone very wrong (e.g. something goes wrong in the CLR).

In fact its actually surprisingly difficult to create a zombie thread (I had to P/Invoke into a function that esentially tells you in the documentation not to call it outside of C). For example the following (awful) code actually doesn't create a zombie thread.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var thread = new Thread(Target);
    thread.Start();
    // Ugh, never call Abort...
    thread.Abort();
    Console.ReadLine();
}

private static void Target()
{
    // Ouch, open file which isn't closed...
    var file = File.Open("test.txt", FileMode.OpenOrCreate);
    while (true)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1);
    }
    GC.KeepAlive(file);
}

Despite making some pretty awful mistakes, the handle to "test.txt" is still closed as soon as Abort is called (as part of the finalizer for file which under the covers uses SafeFileHandle to wrap its file handle)

The locking example in C.Evenhuis answer is probably the easiest way to fail to release a resource (a lock in this case) when a thread is terminated in a non-weird way, but thats easily fixed by either using a lock statement instead, or putting the release in a finally block.

See also

share|improve this answer
2  
i remember when i played with saving stuff in excel using a backgroundworker i didnt released all the resources all the time (because i just skipped debugging etc). in the taskmanager i saw afterwards about 50 excel processes. did i create zombieexcelprocesses? –  Stefan Nov 19 '13 at 11:18
3  
@Justin - +1 - Great answer. I'm a little skeptical of your ExitThread call though. Obviously, it works, but it feels more like a clever trick than a realistic scenario. One of my goals is to learn what not to do so that I don't accidentally create zombie threads with .NET code. I probably could have figured out that calling C++ code that's known to cause that issue from .NET code would produce the desired effect. You obviously know a lot about this stuff. Do you know of any other cases (possibly weird, but not weird enough to never happen unintentionally) with the same result? –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 12:05
1  
So the answer is 'not in c# 4', right? If you have to jump out of the CLR to get a zombie thread, it doesn't seem like a .Net problem. –  Gusdor Nov 19 '13 at 12:39
3  
@Stefan I would say almost definitely not. I've done what you described plenty of times. The Excel processes are not zombies as they are still running though not immediately accessible via the normal UI. You should be able to retrieve them via calls to GetObject. Set excelInstance = GetObject(, "Excel.Application") –  Daniel Cook Nov 19 '13 at 13:55
6  
"The resulting zombie thread will never release the handle to the "test.txt" file and so the file will remain open until the program terminates" is incorrect. Small proof: ` static void Main(string[] args) { new Thread(GcCollect).Start(); new Thread(Target).Start(); Console.ReadLine(); } private static void Target() { using (var file = File.Open("test.txt", FileMode.OpenOrCreate)) { ExitThread(0); } } private static void GcCollect() { while (true) { Thread.Sleep(10000); GC.Collect(); } }` –  Sinix Nov 20 '13 at 7:14

I've cleaned up my answer a bit, but left the original one below for reference

It’s the first time I've heard of the term zombies so I'll assume its definition is:

A thread that has terminated without releasing all of its resources

So given that definition, then yes, you can do that in .NET, as with other languages (C/C++, java).

However, I do not think this as a good reason not to write threaded, mission critical code in .NET. There may be other reasons to decide against .NET but writing off .NET just because you can have zombie threads somehow doesn't make sense to me. Zombie threads are possible in C/C++ (I'd even argue that it’s a lot easier to mess up in C) and a lot of critical, threaded apps are in C/C++ (high volume trading, databases etc).

Conclusion If you are in the process of deciding on a language to use, then I suggest you take the big picture into consideration: performance, team skills, schedule, integration with existing apps etc. Sure, zombie threads are something that you should think about, but since it’s so difficult to actually make this mistake in .NET compared to other languages like C, I think this concern will be overshadowed by other things like the ones mentioned above. Good luck!

Original Answer Zombies can exist if you don't write proper threading code. The same is true for other languages like C/C++ and Java. But this is not a reason not to write threaded code in .NET.

And just like with any other language, know the price before using something. It also helps to know what is happening under the hood so you can foresee any potential problems.

Reliable code for mission critical systems is not easy to write, whatever language you're in. But I'm positive it’s not impossible to do correctly in .NET. Also AFAIK, .NET threading is not that different from threading in C/C++, it uses (or is built from) the same system calls except for some .net specific constructs (like the light weight versions of RWL and event classes).

first time I've heard of the term zombies but based on your description, your colleague probably meant a thread that terminated without release all resources. This could potentially cause a deadlock, memory leak or some other bad side effect. This is obviously not desirable but singling out .NET because of this possibility is probably not a good idea since it’s possible in other languages too. I'd even argue that it’s easier to mess up in C/C++ than in .NET (especially so in C where you don't have RAII) but a lot of critical apps are written in C/C++ right? So it really depends on your individual circumstances. If you want to extract every ounce of speed from your application and want to get as close to bare metal as possible, then .NET might not be the best solution. If you are on a tight budget and do a lot of interfacing with web services/existing .net libraries/etc then .NET may be a good choice.

share|improve this answer
    
(1) I'm not sure how to figure out what's happening under the hood when I hit dead end extern methods. If you've got a suggestion, I'd love to hear it. (2) I would agree it's possible to do in .NET. I would like to believe it's possible with locking, but I have yet to find a satisfying answer to justify that today –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 9:06
1  
@smartcaveman if what you mean by locking is the lock keyword, then probably not since it serializes execution. To maximize throughput, you'd have to use the right constructs depending on the characteristics of your code. I'd say if you can write reliable code in c/c++/java/whatever using pthreads/boost/thread pools/whatever, then you can write it in C# too. But if you can't write reliable code in any language using any library, then I doubt writing in C# will be any different. –  Jerahmeel Nov 19 '13 at 9:18
    
@smartcaveman as for figuring out what's under the hood, google helps heaps and if you're issue is too exotic to find on the web, reflector is very handy. But for the threading classes, I find the MSDN documentation very useful. And a lot of it are just wrappers for the same system calls you use in C anway. –  Jerahmeel Nov 19 '13 at 9:21
    
Jerahmeel, (1) If you can find something on Google that makes this look like a LMGTFY question, I will PayPal you $100 immediately. Otherwise, please be fair. (2) You can't use reflector on extern methods. (3) I don't know C. Can you recommend a good book/resource targeting strong programmers who haven't worked with C before? –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 9:29
    
@smartcaveman not at all, that's not what I meant. I'm sorry if it came across that way. What I wanted to say is that you shouldn't be too quick to write off .NET when writing a critical application. Sure, you could do stuff that maybe a lot worse than zombie threads (which I think are just threads that didn't release any unmanaged resources, which can totally happen in other languages: stackoverflow.com/questions/14268080/…), but again, that doesn't mean that .NET is not a viable solution. –  Jerahmeel Nov 19 '13 at 11:11

Right now most of my answer has been corrected by the comments below. I won't delete the answer because I need the reputation points because the information in the comments may be valuable to readers.

Immortal Blue pointed out that in .NET 2.0 and up finally blocks are immune to thread aborts. And as commented by Andreas Niedermair, this may not be an actual zombie thread, but the following example shows how aborting a thread can cause problems:

class Program
{
    static readonly object _lock = new object();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(Zombie));
        thread.Start();
        Thread.Sleep(500);
        thread.Abort();

        Monitor.Enter(_lock);
        Console.WriteLine("Main entered");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static void Zombie()
    {
        Monitor.Enter(_lock);
        Console.WriteLine("Zombie entered");
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Monitor.Exit(_lock);
        Console.WriteLine("Zombie exited");
    }
}

However when using a lock() { } block, the finally would still be executed when a ThreadAbortException is fired that way.

The following information, as it turns out, is only valid for .NET 1 and .NET 1.1:

If inside the lock() { } block an other exception occurs, and the ThreadAbortException arrives exactly when the finally block is about to be ran, the lock is not released. As you mentioned, the lock() { } block is compiled as:

finally 
{
    if (lockWasTaken) 
        Monitor.Exit(temp); 
}

If another thread calls Thread.Abort() inside the generated finally block, the lock may not be released.

share|improve this answer
2  
you are talking about lock() but i cannot see any usage of this ... so - how is this connected? this is a "wrong" usage of Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit (lacking the usage of try and finally) –  Andreas Niedermair Nov 19 '13 at 7:59
4  
I would not call that a zombie-thread - this is simply a wrong usage of Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit without proper usage of try and finally - anyway, your scenario will lock other threads which might hang on to _lock, so there's a deadlock-scenario - not necessarily a zombie thread ... Also, you are not releasing the lock in Main ... but, hey ... maybe the OP is locking for deadlocking instead of zombie-threads :) –  Andreas Niedermair Nov 19 '13 at 8:01
1  
@AndreasNiedermair perhaps the definition of a zombie thread isn't quite what I thought. Perhaps we can call this a "thread that has terminated execution but has not released all resources". Tempted to delete & do my homework, but keeping the answer for the resemblance to the OP's scenario. –  C.Evenhuis Nov 19 '13 at 8:05
2  
no offence here! actually your answer just got me thinking about it :) as the OP is explicitely talking about locks not being released, i believe his co-mate talked about dead-locking - because a lock is no real-resource which is bound to a thread (it's shared... nöna) - and therefore any "zombie" thread could be avoided by sticking to best-practices and using lock or proper try/finally-usage –  Andreas Niedermair Nov 19 '13 at 8:09
1  
@C.Evenhuis - I'm not sure that my definition is accurate. Part of why I'm asking the question is to clear this up. I think the concept is referred to heavily in C/C++ –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 8:19

This isn't about Zombie threads, but the book Effective C# has a section on implementing IDisposable, (item 17), which talks about Zombie objects which I thought you may find interesting.

I recommend reading the book itself, but the gist of it is that if you have a class either implementing IDisposable, or containing a Desctructor, the only thing you should be doing in either is releasing resources. If you do other things here, then there is a chance that the object will not be garbage collected, but will also not be accessible in any way.

It gives an example similar to below:

internal class Zombie
{
    private static readonly List<Zombie> _undead = new List<Zombie>();

    ~Zombie()
    {
        _undead.Add(this);
    }
}

When the destructor on this object is called, a reference to itself is placed on the global list, meaning it stays alive and in memory for the life of the program, but isn't accessible. This may mean that resources (particularly unmanaged resources) may not be fully released, which can cause all sorts of potential issues.

A more complete example is below. By the time the foreach loop is reached, you have 150 objects in the Undead list each containing an image, but the image has been GC'd and you get an exception if you try to use it. In this example, I am getting an ArgumentException (Parameter is not valid) when I try and do anything with the image, whether I try to save it, or even view dimensions such as height and width:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (var i = 0; i < 150; i++)
        {
            CreateImage();
        }

        GC.Collect();

        //Something to do while the GC runs
        FindPrimeNumber(1000000);

        foreach (var zombie in Zombie.Undead)
        {
            //object is still accessable, image isn't
            zombie.Image.Save(@"C:\temp\x.png");
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    //Borrowed from here
    //http://stackoverflow.com/a/13001749/969613
    public static long FindPrimeNumber(int n)
    {
        int count = 0;
        long a = 2;
        while (count < n)
        {
            long b = 2;
            int prime = 1;// to check if found a prime
            while (b * b <= a)
            {
                if (a % b == 0)
                {
                    prime = 0;
                    break;
                }
                b++;
            }
            if (prime > 0)
                count++;
            a++;
        }
        return (--a);
    }

    private static void CreateImage()
    {
        var zombie = new Zombie(new Bitmap(@"C:\temp\a.png"));
        zombie.Image.Save(@"C:\temp\b.png");
    }
}

internal class Zombie
{
    public static readonly List<Zombie> Undead = new List<Zombie>();

    public Zombie(Image image)
    {
        Image = image;
    }

    public Image Image { get; private set; }

    ~Zombie()
    {
        Undead.Add(this);
    }
}

Again, I am aware you were asking about zombie threads in particular, but the question title is about zombies in .net, and I was reminded of this and thought others may find it interesting!

share|improve this answer
1  
This is interesting. Is _undead meant to be static? –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 9:52
    
Yeah it is, sorry! –  JMK Nov 19 '13 at 9:52
    
So I tried it, with some printing out of the "destructed" object. It treats it like a normal object. Is there anything problematic about doing this? –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 9:57
5  
Yay downvotes, downvoter care to comment? –  JMK Nov 19 '13 at 10:18
1  
Surely it's not so much IDisposable that's the issue. I get the concern with finalizers (destructors) but just having IDisposable won't make an object go to the finalizer queue and risk this zombie scenario. This warning concerns finalizers, and they might call Dispose methods. There are examples where IDisposable is used in types without finalizers. The sentiment should be for resource clean-up, but that could be non-trivial resource clean-up. RX validly uses IDisposable for clean up of subscriptions and can call other downstream resources. (I didn't downvote either btw...) –  James World Nov 19 '13 at 14:14

On critical systems under heavy load, writing lock-free code is better primarily because of the performance improvments. Look at stuff like LMAX and how it leverages "mechanical sympathy" for great discussions of this. Worry about zombie threads though? I think that's an edge case that's just a bug to be ironed out, and not a good enough reason not to use lock.

Sounds more like your friend is just being fancy and flaunting his knowledege of obscure exotic terminology to me! In all the time I was running the performance labs at Microsoft UK, I never came across an instance of this issue in .NET.

share|improve this answer
    
I think different sets of experiences make us paranoid about different bugs. He acknowledged it's an extreme edge case while explaining it, but if it really is an edge-case and not a never-case, I'd like to at least understand it a little better - Thanks for your input –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 8:27
    
Fair enough. I just wouldn't want you to be disproportionately worried about the lock statement! –  James World Nov 19 '13 at 8:49
    
I'd be much less worried if I had a deeper understanding of this issue. –  smartcaveman Nov 19 '13 at 9:04
4  
I upvoted because you are trying to get rid of some thread-FUD, of which there is far too much. Lock-FUD is going to take more work to dispose of:) I just cringe when devs take an unbounded spinlock, (for performance), so that they can copy 50K of data onto a wide queue. –  Martin James Nov 19 '13 at 15:47
1  
Yes, in both the general and particular. Writing correct lock-free code is about as challenging as programming gets. In my experience for the vast majority of cases, big fat course-grained (relatively) easy to comprehend lock blocks are just fine. I would at avoid introducing complexity for the sake of performance optimization until you know you need to. –  James World Nov 20 '13 at 22:22

1.Is there a clearer definition of a "zombie thread" than what I've explained here?

I do agree that "Zombie Threads" exist, it's a term to refer to what happens with Threads that are left with resources that they don't let go of and yet don't completely die, hence the name "zombie," so your explanation of this referral is pretty right on the money!

2.Can zombie threads occur on .NET? (Why/Why not?)

Yes they can occur. It's a reference, and actually referred to by Windows as "zombie": MSDN uses the Word "Zombie" for Dead processes/threads

Happening frequently it's another story, and depends on your coding techniques and practices, as for you that like Thread Locking and have done it for a while I wouldn't even worry about that scenario happening to you.

And Yes, as @KevinPanko correctly mentioned in the comments, "Zombie Threads" do come from Unix which is why they are used in XCode-ObjectiveC and referred to as "NSZombie" and used for debugging. It behaves pretty much the same way... the only difference is an object that should've died becomes a "ZombieObject" for debugging instead of the "Zombie Thread" which might be a potential problem in your code.

share|improve this answer
    
But the way MSDN uses zombie is very different from the way this question is using it. –  Ben Voigt Nov 20 '13 at 16:14
    
Oh yes I agree, but I was making a point that even MSDN refers to threads as Zombie Threads when dead. and that they in fact can occur. –  Steven Hernandez Nov 20 '13 at 16:29
3  
Sure, but it's referring to some other code still holding a handle to the thread, not the thread holding handles to resources when it exited. Your first sentence, agreeing with the definition in the question, is what's wrong. –  Ben Voigt Nov 20 '13 at 16:30
    
Ahh I see your point. To be honest I didn't even notice that. I was focusing to his point that the definition exists, regardless of how it happens. Remember that the definition exist because of what happens to the thread, and not how it is done. –  Steven Hernandez Nov 20 '13 at 16:35

protected by Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 18 '13 at 7:57

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.