Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible to force a task to execute synchronously, on the current thread?

That is, is it possible, by e.g. passing some parameter to StartNew(), to make this code:

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => ThisShouldBeExecutedSynchronously());

behave like this:

ThisShouldBeExecutedSynchronously();

Background:

I have an interface called IThreads:

public interface IThreads
{
    Task<TRet> StartNew<TRet>(Func<TRet> func);
}

I would like to have two implemenetations of this, one normal that uses threads:

public class Threads : IThreads
{
    public Task<TRet> StartNew<TRet>(Func<TRet> func)
    {
        return Task.Factory.StartNew(func);
    }
}

And one that does not use threads (used in some testing scenarios):

public class NoThreading : IThreads
{
    public Task<TRet> StartNew<TRet>(Func<TRet> func)
    {
        // What do I write here?
    }
}

I could let the NoThreading version just call func(), but I want to return an instance of Task<TRet> on which I can perform operations such as ContinueWith().

share|improve this question
    
What testing scenarios is the NoThreading implementation used? It seems strange that an implementation of IThreads exists that does not in fact have anything to do with threading. – Todd Bowles Nov 19 '13 at 8:18
    
@Todd Bowles: I dislike so much when instead of answering question people say "Huh, why are you asking this? you are not supposed to ask this." – Simple Fellow Nov 5 '15 at 9:53
    
@SimpleFellow I understand where you are coming from, but an important part of providing help is to understand the problem and the context. In this case, IThreads feels like a leaky abstraction, whose non-threaded implementation will be confusing for a future developer. – Todd Bowles Jan 7 at 23:18
    
@ToddBowles Would it be better if I change the name of the interface IThreads to e.g. ITasks? In comparison, Task.Factory.StartNew() does not necessarily start a new thread. So with a better name the abstraction leak would be gone and the question is valid, right? – Torbjörn Kalin Jan 8 at 6:19
    
@Todd Bowles "I understand where you are coming from" -- So where am I coming from? – Simple Fellow Jan 11 at 10:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Task scheduler decides whether to run a task on a new thread or on the current thread. There is an option to force running it on a new thread, but none forcing it to run on the current thread.

But there is a method Task.RunSynchronously() which

Runs the Task synchronously on the current TaskScheduler.

More on MSDN.

Also if you are using async/await there is already a similar question on that.

share|improve this answer
    
RunSynchronously() works great! – Torbjörn Kalin Nov 19 '13 at 8:34
3  
Unfortunately, RunSynchronously does not always run the task synchronously. It has similar corner cases as ExecuteSynchronously. – Stephen Cleary Nov 19 '13 at 12:01

You can simply return the result of func() wrapped in a Task.

public class NoThreading : IThreads
{
    public Task<TRet> StartNew<TRet>(Func<TRet> func)
    {
        return Task.FromResult(func());
    }
}

Now you can attach "continue with" tasks to this.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution. Unfortunately for me is that it requires .NET 4.5. – Torbjörn Kalin Nov 19 '13 at 8:33
    
@TorbjörnKalin You can do the same thing on .Net 4.0, it's just more verbose. Have a look at TaskCompletionSource (also explained in Eren's answer). – svick Nov 19 '13 at 10:35

Since you mention testing, you might prefer using a TaskCompletionSource<T> since it also lets you set an exception or set the task as cancelled (works in .Net 4 and 4.5):

Return a completed task with a result:

var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<TRet>();
tcs.SetResult(func());
return tcs.Task;

Return a faulted task:

var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<TRet>();
tcs.SetException(new InvalidOperationException());
return tcs.Task;

Return a canceled task:

var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<TRet>();
tcs.SetCanceled();
return tcs.Task;
share|improve this answer

Yes, you can pretty much do that using custom task schedulers.

internal class MyScheduler : TaskScheduler
{
    protected override IEnumerable<Task> GetScheduledTasks()
    {
        return Enumerable.Empty<Task>();
    }

    protected override void QueueTask(Task task)
    {
        base.TryExecuteTask(task);
    }

    protected override bool TryExecuteTaskInline(Task task, bool taskWasPreviouslyQueued)
    {
        base.TryExecuteTask(task);
        return true;
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId + " Main");

    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => ThisShouldBeExecutedSynchronously(), CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, new MyScheduler());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This actually ended up being my solution, creating my own TaskScheduler. With the other solutions, I ended up with other problems, such as not being able to run ContinueWith() on the main thread. This one worked all the way. – Torbjörn Kalin Nov 19 '13 at 11:59
    
@TorbjörnKalin Oh.. Why can't you use ContinueWith on main thread? – Sriram Sakthivel Nov 19 '13 at 12:02
    
I get an error when using TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext(). Found a solution for that here, but when using it the ContinueWith() call ended up on a different thread. Probably something I did wrong, but I got tired of trying... – Torbjörn Kalin Nov 19 '13 at 12:16

OP here. This is my final solution (which actually solves a lot more than I asked about).

I use the same implementation for Threads in both test and production, but pass in different TaskSchedulers:

public class Threads
{
    private readonly TaskScheduler _executeScheduler;
    private readonly TaskScheduler _continueScheduler;

    public Threads(TaskScheduler executeScheduler, TaskScheduler continueScheduler)
    {
        _executeScheduler = executeScheduler;
        _continueScheduler = continueScheduler;
    }

    public TaskContinuation<TRet> StartNew<TRet>(Func<TRet> func)
    {
        var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(func, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, _executeScheduler);
        return new TaskContinuation<TRet>(task, _continueScheduler);
    }
}

I wrap the Task in a TaskContinuation class in order to be able to specify TaskScheduler for the ContinueWith() call.

public class TaskContinuation<TRet>
{
    private readonly Task<TRet> _task;
    private readonly TaskScheduler _scheduler;

    public TaskContinuation(Task<TRet> task, TaskScheduler scheduler)
    {
        _task = task;
        _scheduler = scheduler;
    }

    public void ContinueWith(Action<Task<TRet>> func)
    {
        _task.ContinueWith(func, _scheduler);
    }
}

I create my custom TaskScheduler that dispatches the action on the thread that scheduler was created on:

public class CurrentThreadScheduler : TaskScheduler
{
    private readonly Dispatcher _dispatcher;

    public CurrentThreadScheduler()
    {
        _dispatcher = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;
    }

    protected override void QueueTask(Task task)
    {
        _dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Func<bool>(() => TryExecuteTask(task)));
    }

    protected override bool TryExecuteTaskInline(Task task, bool taskWasPreviouslyQueued)
    {
        return true;
    }

    protected override IEnumerable<Task> GetScheduledTasks()
    {
        return Enumerable.Empty<Task>();
    }
}

Now I can specify the behaviour by passing in different TaskSchedulers to the Threads constructor.

new Threads(TaskScheduler.Default, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()); // Production
new Threads(TaskScheduler.Default, new CurrentThreadScheduler()); // Let the tests use background threads
new Threads(new CurrentThreadScheduler(), new CurrentThreadScheduler()); // No threads, all synchronous

Finally, since the event loop doesn't run automatically in my unit test, I have to execute it manually. Whenever I need to wait for a background operation to complete I execute the following (from the main thread):

DispatcherHelper.DoEvents();

The DispatcherHelper can be found here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.