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I have a WPF ListBox that is set to scroll horizontally. The ItemsSource is bound to an ObservableCollection in my ViewModel class. Every time a new item is added, I want the ListBox to scroll to the right so that the new item is viewable.

The ListBox is defined in a DataTemplate, so I am unable to access the ListBox by name in my code behind file.

How can I get a ListBox to always scroll to show a latest added item?

I would like a way to know when the ListBox has a new item added to it, but I do not see an event that does this.

Thanks!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You can extend the behavior of the ListBox by using attached properties. In your case I would define an attached property called ScrollOnNewItem that when set to true hooks into the INotifyCollectionChanged events of the list box items source and upon detecting a new item, scrolls the list box to it.

Example:

public class ListBoxBehavior
{
    static Dictionary<ListBox, Capture> Associations = 
        new Dictionary<ListBox, Capture>();

    public static bool GetScrollOnNewItem(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (bool)obj.GetValue(ScrollOnNewItemProperty);
    }

    public static void SetScrollOnNewItem(DependencyObject obj, bool value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(ScrollOnNewItemProperty, value);
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty ScrollOnNewItemProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
            "ScrollOnNewItem", 
            typeof(bool), 
            typeof(ListBoxBehavior), 
            new UIPropertyMetadata(false, OnScrollOnNewItemChanged));

    public static void OnScrollOnNewItemChanged(
        DependencyObject d, 
        DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var listBox = d as ListBox;
        if (listBox == null) return;
        bool oldValue = (bool)e.OldValue, newValue = (bool)e.NewValue;
        if (newValue == oldValue) return;
        if (newValue)
        {
            listBox.Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(ListBox_Loaded);
            listBox.Unloaded += new RoutedEventHandler(ListBox_Unloaded);
        }
        else
        {
            listBox.Loaded -= ListBox_Loaded;
            listBox.Unloaded -= ListBox_Unloaded;
            if (Associations.ContainsKey(listBox))
                Associations[listBox].Dispose();
        }
    }

    static void ListBox_Unloaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var listBox = (ListBox)sender;
        if (Associations.ContainsKey(listBox))
            Associations[listBox].Dispose();
        listBox.Unloaded -= ListBox_Unloaded;
    }

    static void ListBox_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var listBox = (ListBox)sender;
        var incc = listBox.Items as INotifyCollectionChanged;
        if (incc == null) return;
        listBox.Loaded -= ListBox_Loaded;
        Associations[listBox] = new Capture(listBox);
    }

    class Capture : IDisposable
    {
        public ListBox listBox { get; set; }
        public INotifyCollectionChanged incc { get; set; }

        public Capture(ListBox listBox)
        {
            this.listBox = listBox;
            incc = listBox.ItemsSource as INotifyCollectionChanged;
            if(incc != null)
            {
                incc.CollectionChanged += 
                    new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(incc_CollectionChanged);
            }
        }

        void incc_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add)
            {
                listBox.ScrollIntoView(e.NewItems[0]);
                listBox.SelectedItem = e.NewItems[0];
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if(incc != null)
                incc.CollectionChanged -= incc_CollectionChanged;
        }
    }
}

Usage:

<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding SourceCollection}" 
         lb:ListBoxBehavior.ScrollOnNewItem="true"/>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I added this code to my project and it worked as is! I really appreciate the quick and accurate reply. I don't quite understand what is happening on the line: var incc = listBox.Items as INotifyCollectionChanged; How can listBox Items be cast to INotifyCollectionChanged? Where can I learn more about creating attached properties in general? –  Rob Buhler Jan 5 '10 at 19:51
1  
update: the code above works most of the time for me - at times listbox items are added and the listbox does not scroll. –  Rob Buhler Jan 5 '10 at 20:11
    
I think I meant to write listBox.ItemsSource... I'll try that. Btw it works for me every time, perhaps it's a problem with focus. Does the selection change work always? –  Aviad P. Jan 5 '10 at 20:27
    
+1 great post, I added what I did below, using your notations, just as a different option/packaging.. –  denis morozov Jul 17 '12 at 20:38
<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding SourceCollection}">
    <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <Behaviors:ScrollOnNewItem/>
    </i:Interaction.Behaviors>              
</ItemsControl>

public class ScrollOnNewItem : Behavior<ItemsControl>
{
    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        AssociatedObject.Loaded += OnLoaded;
        AssociatedObject.Unloaded += OnUnLoaded;
    }

    protected override void OnDetaching()
    {
        AssociatedObject.Loaded -= OnLoaded;
        AssociatedObject.Unloaded -= OnUnLoaded;
    }

    private void OnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var incc = AssociatedObject.ItemsSource as INotifyCollectionChanged;
        if (incc == null) return;

        incc.CollectionChanged += OnCollectionChanged;
    }

    private void OnUnLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var incc = AssociatedObject.ItemsSource as INotifyCollectionChanged;
        if (incc == null) return;

        incc.CollectionChanged -= OnCollectionChanged;
    }

    private void OnCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if(e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add)
        {
            int count = AssociatedObject.Items.Count;
            if (count == 0) 
                return; 

            var item = AssociatedObject.Items[count - 1];

            var frameworkElement = AssociatedObject.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(item) as FrameworkElement;
            if (frameworkElement == null) return;

            frameworkElement.BringIntoView();
        }
    }
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2  
Very nice, I wasn't aware of the Behavior(Of T) class at all! Looks more brief and readable. –  Aviad P. Jul 18 '12 at 20:07
    
BringIntoView() doesn't seem to work. In debug, I can see the code executing, but the ListBox doesn't scroll. I saw someone else having a similar issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/12430923/… –  Nathan Sep 26 '12 at 18:52
1  
Also, there is this evolution, stackoverflow.com/questions/12255055/… that is supposed to stop the scrolling if the user has scrolled up. I am still having trouble getting the behavior to work. In both cases, the item container doesn't seem to exist. –  Nathan Sep 26 '12 at 19:50
    
since you are using a listbox, you should probably use listBox.ScrollIntoView(). I am pretty sure that should work. –  denis morozov Sep 26 '12 at 20:34

I use this solution: http://michlg.wordpress.com/2010/01/16/listbox-automatically-scroll-currentitem-into-view/.

It works even if you bind listbox's ItemsSource to an ObservableCollection that is manipulated in a non-UI thread.

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I found an really slick way to do this, simply update the listbox scrollViewer and set position to the bottom. Call this function in one of the ListBox Events like SelectionChanged for example.

 private void UpdateScrollBar(ListBox listBox)
    {
        if (listBox != null)
        {
            var border = (Border)VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(listBox, 0);
            var scrollViewer = (ScrollViewer)VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(border, 0);
            scrollViewer.ScrollToBottom();
        }

    }
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greate answer! I tried your answer on the forth attemp, and this is the only the worked! –  Guy Segal Jun 17 at 15:36

I found a much simpler way which helped me with a similar problem, just a couple of lines of code behind, no need to create custom Behaviors. Check my answer to this question (and follow the link within):

wpf(C#) DataGrid ScrollIntoView - how to scroll to the first row that is not shown?

It works for ListBox, ListView and DataGrid.

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solution for Datagrid (the same for ListBox, only substitute DataGrid with ListBox class)

    private void OnCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Action == NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add)
        {
            int count = AssociatedObject.Items.Count;
            if (count == 0)
                return;

            var item = AssociatedObject.Items[count - 1];

            if (AssociatedObject is DataGrid)
            {
                DataGrid grid = (AssociatedObject as DataGrid);
                grid.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke((Action)(() =>
                {
                    grid.UpdateLayout();
                    grid.ScrollIntoView(item, null);
                }));
            }

        }
    }
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