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I was running a 1 Producer thread, 1 Consumer thread problem with a shared buffer and a temporary cache (of 1000 elements).

The eclipse execution (ECJ) utilizes 33% CPU (1 core for producer, 1 for consumer and 1 for main thread{minimal processing}).

On executing the same code compiled on a javac I see a utilization of 50% (all 8 virtual cores show some processing).

I am using a Windows 8; quad core system with Hyper-threading (thus the 8 virtual cores).

Can someone explain this? Could my code behave so DIFFERENT in the 2 optimizations?

Here is the code: http://pastebin.com/NBkRTcxV

To recap: I want to know why a javac compilation utilizes so much more CPU than ECJ? Please understand that I have only 2 threads (1 producer and 1 consumer) so ideally only 2 cores (=1 physical core) should be utilized ( = 25% CPU)

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Can you explain what "running ... code on a javac" is supposed to mean? – Ingo Nov 19 '13 at 10:36
    
@Ingo: Corrected my vocabulary. I meant executed after being compiled with javac – Struggler Nov 20 '13 at 4:07
    
It is not clear what you're asking - please try to be more explicit so we know what we should look into. – Matt Nov 20 '13 at 11:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The CPU is free to divide the threads among different cores as it chooses. There are native libraries that allow you to set the thread affinity, for example our own Peter Lawrey's library.

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Can someone explain this? Could my code behave so DIFFERENT in the 2 optimizations?

It is most likely the operating system thread scheduler that is doing this, and nothing to do with compilers.

My guess is that the operating system's thread scheduler is noticing Eclipse threads with interactive behaviour (e.g. handling windowing events etc in Java), and keeping capacity in reserve to handle this.

But it could also be some artefact of your benchmark. Artificial benchmarks often have that problem.


UPDATE - If you are convinced it is compilers (javac versus ejc), then you can prove or disprove this by taking the compiled code from the respective compilers and executing it from the command line.

The other thing is that using a larger percentage of the CPU could actually be a good thing. Measure the clock time taken to perform a quantum of "work". The "javac" version could be using more CPU because it is doing work faster.

Maintaining a predictable CPU utilization is not normally a design goal. People are usually more concerned at the rate at which an application does (useful) work.

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Since I am using none of those capabilities, it seems unlikely for OS (windows 8) to presume that. I would like to point out however, that the ECJ's behavior can be explained - 2 thread + 1 main thread thus 3/8 cores used. It is the javac's behavior that concerns me. Also there is little of "benchmarking" going on here. Simple CPU utilization measurement. – Struggler Nov 20 '13 at 4:11
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If you are convinced it is compilers (javac versus ejc), then you can prove or disprove this by taking the compiled code from the respective compilers and executing it from the command line. – Stephen C Nov 21 '13 at 1:24

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