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I wonder how many times the 2 piece of code will be executed. Both of them are n times or one of them is n+1 ?

int sum=0;
for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) 
sum = sum + i; 

AND

int sum=0;
for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i) 
sum = sum + i; 

Is there anyone to help me ?

EDIT Sınce I got so many , bad comment. I decided to give my real intent to ask this.

int sum = 0;
for (int i = 1; i <= n; ++i)
sum = sum + f1(i, n);}

int f1(int x, int n) { 
int sum = 0; 
for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) 
sum = sum + i; 
return (x + sum); } 

The exact complexity of this code snippet is O(n*(n+1)) and I want to learn why there is(n+1) instead of o(n*n)

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closed as off-topic by Mitch Wheat, Arne Mertz, John3136, Angew, GuyGreer Mar 1 at 1:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Arne Mertz, Angew
  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – Mitch Wheat, John3136
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
You didn't even test it? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 19 '13 at 10:32
1  
Ask yourself what the answer is if n is 1. Btw, you should indent whatever the for loop controls (i.e., sum = …). –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 19 '13 at 10:32
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes I tested it and according to me, they'll execute same time.However the exact complexity for edited version of this question is O(n*(n+1)) and I wonder where the 1 is comes. –  caesar Nov 19 '13 at 10:36
    
@MitchWheat then, what is that = –  caesar Nov 19 '13 at 10:38
    
I think it's O(n*n). By the way, there is no difference between O(n*(n+1)) and O(n*n). –  David Nov 19 '13 at 10:53
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It doesn't matter which one you use, the program output will be identical; i++ and ++i are not the termination conditions in the for loop but are statements evaluated at the end of each iteration.

Note however that ++i will never be slower than i++; as conceptually an object copy has to be taken for the latter. A good compiler will optimise out the copy though.

And a point of style: please indent the line sum = sum + i;; it's hard to read otherwise.

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I think the code complexity of the code is O(n^2). It doesn't matter about looping for n+1 in complexity. O(n+1) = O(n-1) = O(n) so all are same and the complexity can be said to be n^2.

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