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Firstly, I realize that there are already many questions about efficiency out there, so I apologize if this is a duplicate, but I'm here because I couldn't find what I was looking for. I'm going to ask this question with an example:

I have some time series data which I import from excel into a pandas dataframe. It has columns for id | name | date | total_monthly_rtn and I am doing some simple manipulations for reporting purposes (Month, 3M, YTD, ITD, etc). Then I split this dataframe by id/name, and store it in Account objects:

import pandas as ps
from pandas.tseries.offsets import YearEnd, DateOffset

class Account(object):
    def __init__(self, df):
        self.name = df['name'][0]
        self.id = df['id'][0]
        self.rtn = ps.TimeSeries(df['total_monthly_rtn'].values, index=ps.DatetimeIndex(df['date'], freq='M'))
        self.m = DateOffset(months=1)


# dataframe mentioned above with 4 columns (id;name;date;total_monthly_rtn)
data = parsexl(src_path) # parsexl not needed for this question

valdate = max(data['date'])
y = YearEnd()

# an example of one slice of 'data'
foo = Account(data[data['id'] == '123456'])

# where 'data[data['id'] == '123456']' looks like:
        id         name                date total_monthly_rtn
0   123456  Bank of Foo 2011-07-31 00:00:00             -2.75
1   123456  Bank of Foo 2011-08-31 00:00:00             -7.63
2   123456  Bank of Foo 2011-09-30 00:00:00             -4.03
3   123456  Bank of Foo 2011-10-31 00:00:00              5.68
4   123456  Bank of Foo 2011-11-30 00:00:00             -1.79
5   123456  Bank of Foo 2011-12-31 00:00:00              0.93
6   123456  Bank of Foo 2012-01-31 00:00:00            3.0773
7   123456  Bank of Foo 2012-02-29 00:00:00            5.4896
8   123456  Bank of Foo 2012-03-31 00:00:00            0.5089
9   123456  Bank of Foo 2012-04-30 00:00:00           -2.0739
10  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-05-31 00:00:00           -6.0472
11  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-06-30 00:00:00            4.7578
12  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-07-31 00:00:00            2.1529
13  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-08-31 00:00:00            1.0867
14  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-09-30 00:00:00            0.3791
15  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-10-31 00:00:00             1.143
16  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-11-30 00:00:00            3.3823
17  123456  Bank of Foo 2012-12-31 00:00:00            0.6535
18  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-01-31 00:00:00            7.3905
19  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-02-28 00:00:00            3.5779
20  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-03-31 00:00:00            2.3466
21  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-04-30 00:00:00            1.6874
22  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-05-31 00:00:00            0.6536
23  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-06-30 00:00:00           -2.7618
24  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-07-31 00:00:00             3.854
25  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-08-31 00:00:00           -3.6812
26  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-09-30 00:00:00            1.9478
27  123456  Bank of Foo 2013-10-31 00:00:00            3.9654

I originally wrote these two class functions for Account:

    def ytd(self, ye, vd):
        return self.rtn.truncate(before=ye.rollback(vd), after=vd)[1:].sum()

    def year(self, vd):
        return self.rtn.truncate(before=vd-(11*m), after=vd).sum()

# called like:
foo.ytd(y, valdate) # returns 18.9802
foo.year(valdate) # returns 23.016

But then I got to thinking, would it be better to store valdate and YearEnd as class attributes instead? Thus changing these two functions into:

def ytd(self):
    return self.rtn.truncate(before=self.ye.rollback(vd), after=self.vd)[1:].sum()

def year(self):
    return self.rtn.truncate(before=self.vd-(11*m), after=self.vd).sum()

In my application, I'm dealing with ~8,000 rows in data, representing 100-ish accounts, so maybe there won't be a huge impact doing it one way or the other, but in general? My gut tells me that the first way is better, but I'd appreciate it if someone who knows their stuff could put me at ease. Thank you.

== Edit ==

I only included two class functions here, but if it makes a difference, there are actually 10 class functions that take valdate and YearEnd as variables.

== Edit 2 ==

I'm sorry if my example was confusing for some people. And if you don't know: rtn = return; ytd = year to date

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Andy Hayden, oefe, Björn Kaiser, Lee Taylor, B... Nov 20 '13 at 2:25

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I am sure that all these variable names make sense to you, but "YearEnd" (as 1 example) means nothing to us, You will need to choose some better variable names, and include more code or some background information so we can understand what you are doing exactly. Also - What exactly is this supposed to be? foo = Account(data[data['id'] == '123456']) You are making a lot of syntactical mistakes, and strange programming decisions which makes it harder to follow your code. Please edit your question for clarity. Include a working model and some sample input/expected output. –  Inbar Rose Nov 19 '13 at 12:24
    
I'm sorry it was confusing to you. In hindsight, I should have made a more general example which showed the principals of my question without all the things that make sense only to me, but that's how the question occurred to me. I hope my edits help. Also, I'd appreciate it if you could give me an example of these syntactical mistakes and strange programming decisions. –  moarCoffee Nov 19 '13 at 12:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If the question is only about perfs (or more exactly speed), a function-local lookup is faster than an attribute lookup, so your current solution is fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's what I wanted, thank you. –  moarCoffee Nov 19 '13 at 13:17

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