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I have a class which contains this attributes:

public class Person
{
    public long Id { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public int? IdCountry { get; set; }
    public virtual Country Country { get; set; }
    public int? IdState { get; set; }
    public virtual State State { get; set; }
}

public class Country
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class State
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int IdCountry { get; set; }
    public virtual Country Country { get; set; }
}

In a unit test I create 2 objects with the same values

Person expected = new Person()
{
    Name = "blablablbla",
    Id = 1
};
Person actual = PessoaFactory.Create(Name: "blablablbla", Id: 1);
Assert.AreEqual<Person>(expected, actual);

But the Assert.AreEqual throws an exception.

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3  
Because Object.Equals() (what will be finally called) will compare references (you have classes, not structs) and obviously they're two different objects (two instances). Override it if you want to implement some sort of comparison between Person (what kind of comparison...well it depends. ID only? All fields? Up to you). –  Adriano Repetti Nov 19 '13 at 13:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you need to override Equals and GetHashCode:

public override bool Equals(object o)
{
    if (!(o is Person)) { return false; }
    return ((Person)o).Id == this.Id;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.Id;
}

Assert.AreEqual<T> uses the default comparer for the type. The default comparer for that type is to compare hash codes. The hash codes aren't equal.

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2  
...and GetHashCode(). We preach best practice where possible. –  Gusdor Nov 19 '13 at 13:33
    
You will need to override GetHashCode() as well –  Rui Jarimba Nov 19 '13 at 13:34
    
@RuiJarimba, you actually don't have to override the GetHashCode method; but it's a good practice so I modified as such. But let's be clear, it does not have to be done. –  Michael Perrenoud Nov 19 '13 at 13:35
1  
Just an FYI if the OP is comparing multiple properties and not just the ID these need to be taken into consideration in both checks - otherwise new Person { Id = 1, Name = "Person1" }; new Person { Id = 1, Name = "Person2" } would be equal (when the OP might not want them to be). –  James Nov 19 '13 at 13:38
1  
@MichaelPerrenoud sure, plus the OP doesn't really mention whether it is just the ID they are comparing or whether it's a field-level comparison so thought it was worth clarifying. –  James Nov 19 '13 at 14:51

You need to override Equals to compare the objects. The default implementation compares references, not values. See the MSDN documentation.

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Because it is comparing the references not the actual values within it.

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You have two different object references to compare.

Instead use Assert.IsTrue(expected.Id == actual.Id) for example or override Equals and GetHashCode to be able to compare your objects

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The .Net framework itself doesn't handle deep equality cooperation by default, Assert.AreEqual calls the Equals method on the object which is object.Equals if you didn't override the method. Object.Equals is implementing reference check only. You should implement your own Equals method, for example:

public override bool Equals(object o)
{
    var cast = o as Person;
    if (cast == null) 
        return false; 
    return cast.Id == this.Id;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.Id;
}

For more information you can check this MSDN Doc

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