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In javascript, Suppose I have a string called, str = "document". How do I get the Object, Document which references it from the string name?

So what I would like to have is, take the string and get the reference to the Object, with the string name in the current closure.

str = "window"; I would need the reference to the Window Object here.

Is there a dynamic way to get these references?

function getObject(str){
/* logic */

} 

getObject('window'); // returns [object Window]
getObject('document'); // returns [object HTMLDocument]

Use Case: I'm trying to fuzz a few stuff which comes from an array of strings. Here is what am trying to do. Would be great if you guys could tell me the best way to do this.

function hook(Obj, prop, newValue) {
    console.log(Obj, typeof Obj, prop);
        Object.defineProperty(Obj, prop, {
            'get': function () {
                return newValue;
            }
        });     
}

function test(Obj, prop) {
    var before = Obj[prop];
    hook(Obj, prop, 'xyz);
    var after = Obj[prop];

    if( before == after){
        alert(Obj + '.
        '+ prop +'
        Not Changed ');
    } else {
        alert(Obj + '.
        '+ prop +'
        Changed ');
    }
}

var data = [['document', 'domain'], ['window.document', 'location'], ['location', 'href']];
var i=0;
for(i=0; i<data.length; i++){
    test(data[i][0], data[i][1]);
}
share|improve this question
    
This doesn't really make much sense, you can use bracket notation, as in object[property], but the way you're explaining this it seems like you're trying to do something really weird ? –  adeneo Nov 19 '13 at 15:42
    
My first thought on this question is always that it is a XY problem. With proper design you should minimize your need to having to identify variables by their name to an absolute minimum. It is often used as a replacement for proper usage of arrays, for example. –  Ingo Bürk Nov 19 '13 at 15:47
    
Well, yeah ! I'm trying to fuzz a few stuff which comes from an array of strings. Here is what am trying to do. Would be great if you guys could tell me the best way to do this. function test(Obj,prop){ var before = Obj[prop]; hook(Obj, prop, 'xyz); var after = Obj[prop]; if( before == after){ alert(Obj + ' . '+ prop +' Not Changed'); } else { alert(Obj + ' . '+ prop +' Changed'); } } var data = [[document, 'domain'], [window.document, 'location'], [location, 'href']]; var i=0; for(i=0; i<data.length; i++){ test(data[i][0], data[i][1]); } –  Skeptical Nov 19 '13 at 15:49
    
what does hook do? –  Ingo Bürk Nov 19 '13 at 15:52
    
I've added the real use case to the question. –  Skeptical Nov 19 '13 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your object is a global one, then you can do it like this -

window['your-window-object'];

If it a property of another object, then you can do it like this -

obj['property-name'];

In every cases, you need to know the scope of the variable.

Example -

var doc = window['document'];  // gives you the document object
var obj = {
    prop1: 1;
    prop2: 2
}

var propValue = obj['prop1']; // gives you 1

For local variables, you might be tempted to use eval, but you should almost always it. For more information, just google it.

share|improve this answer
    
… and if it's just a local variable, return eval('someVariable'); will work, but it should really never be used (eval is evil). In fact, this whole "get element by stringified name" should be avoided whenever possible. –  Ingo Bürk Nov 19 '13 at 15:44
    
@IngoBürk: Yup, that's right. –  Sayem Ahmed Nov 19 '13 at 15:44
    
Thanks guys. Was just thinking, why wouldn't this[str] work? –  Skeptical Nov 19 '13 at 15:46
1  
@Skeptical: depends on what this represents and where it's used. If you are using this in a function which is called without new, then this will just represent the global window object. If you call that function with new, then this['str'] will work as you expect. –  Sayem Ahmed Nov 19 '13 at 15:47
    
@SayemAhmed So I think, this is what I want. `this[str]' Thanks a lot. –  Skeptical Nov 19 '13 at 16:36

You can obtain the reference by using

function getObject(str)
{
    console.log(this[str]);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
OP asked for "current scope". –  Ingo Bürk Nov 19 '13 at 15:42

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