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I am maintaining an application that has both VB.NET and c# components. I thought these two languages differed only in syntax, but I have found a strange feature in VB.NET that is not present in C#.

In VB.NET, I have the following class:

Public Class bill_staff Inherits System.Windows.Forms.Form
    ....
End Class

If I want to use this class in C#, I do this:

using (var frm = new bill_staff())
    frm.ShowDialog();

However, in the VB.NET code, the class can be used like this:

bill_staff.ShowDialog();

ShowDialog is defined in the metadata like this:

Public Function ShowDialog() As System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult

So in VB.NET, it is possible to call an instance method on the class. As far as I can tell, this seems to implicitly create a new instance of the class, and then calls the method on that object. In C#, this is not possible - static methods must be called on the class, and instance methods must be called on objects.

I can't find any information about this on the Internet. What is the feature called, and is it good practice?

The project was initially converted from VB6 - is it some weird legacy feature?

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you would need to create a new instance of the class before calling ShowDialog() –  Ric Nov 19 '13 at 16:37
    
@Ric You don't. It compiles and runs fine. –  Oliver Nov 19 '13 at 16:38
    
well considering the Function is an instance method and not a class method (ie not a Shared function) I find this quite odd... is an object not being created elsewhere? –  Ric Nov 19 '13 at 16:39
4  
Yes that is legacy behavior. Classes did not show up in VB until v4, before that Form.Show was The way to show forms. So to make previous code compatible with the old way, it is still legal, but as I understand it, it comes with some overhead. Instancing is the better method. You see lots of novice code here doing it the old way which shows they dont quite understand OOP. –  Plutonix Nov 19 '13 at 16:39
    
wow I just gave that a go and you're right! well you learn something new everyday! –  Ric Nov 19 '13 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes that is legacy behavior. Classes did not show up in VB until v4, before that Form.Show was The Way to show forms. In order to keep previous code compatible with the old way (VB3 was very popular), the old method was supported.

It is still supported in .NET as a legal means to show forms, but as I understand it, it comes with some overhead. Instancing is the better method.

It also provides the tinkerer an easy way to program without understanding Object and OOP. Imagine the questions we would have here if Form.Show threw an error.

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+1. The VB6 documentation explains it here. The VB.net documentation mentions it briefly here but doesn't explain why it exists (legacy code). It's explained in this MSDN technical article on VB2005 under My.Forms –  MarkJ Nov 20 '13 at 18:16

For forms, VB creates a default instance for you behind the scenes. e.g., the following VB:

Public Class bill_staff
    Inherits System.Windows.Forms.Form
End Class

class testclass
    sub testmethod()
        bill_staff.Show()
    end sub
end class

is equivalent to the following C#:

public class bill_staff : System.Windows.Forms.Form
{

    private static bill_staff _DefaultInstance;
    public static bill_staff DefaultInstance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_DefaultInstance == null)
                _DefaultInstance = new bill_staff();

            return _DefaultInstance;
        }
    }
}

internal class testclass
{
    public void testmethod()
    {
        bill_staff.DefaultInstance.Show();
    }
}

This only occurs in VB for forms (classes which inherit from System.Windows.Forms.Form). Personally, I think this is a terrible 'feature' of VB - it confuses the distinction between class and instance.

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