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How do you read the animated GIF's control block between each frame? I'm interested in the delay between each frame. I've looked at the Javadoc for ImageReader and I'm not seeing anything.

Here's my code for reading all the frames from the animated GIF, how would I enhance it to read the metadata about each frame embedded in the animated GIF?

    List<BufferedImage> list = new ArrayList<BufferedImage>();
    try {
        ImageReader reader = ImageIO.getImageReadersBySuffix("gif").next();
        reader.setInput(ImageIO.createImageInputStream(urlImage.openStream()));
        int i = reader.getMinIndex();
        int numImages = reader.getNumImages(true);
        while (i < numImages)
        {
            list.add(reader.read(i++));
        }

        // do stuff with frames of image...

    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will have to seek out "delayTime" attribute from metadata node. Use the following working example to understand:

public class GiffTest {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        ImageReader reader = ImageIO.getImageReadersBySuffix("gif").next();
        reader.setInput(ImageIO.createImageInputStream(new FileInputStream("H:\\toonGif.gif")));
        int i = reader.getMinIndex();
        int numImages = reader.getNumImages(true);

        IIOMetadata imageMetaData =  reader.getImageMetadata(0);
        String metaFormatName = imageMetaData.getNativeMetadataFormatName();

    IIOMetadataNode root = (IIOMetadataNode)imageMetaData.getAsTree(metaFormatName);

    IIOMetadataNode graphicsControlExtensionNode = getNode(root, "GraphicControlExtension");

        System.out.println(graphicsControlExtensionNode.getAttribute("delayTime"));
    }

    private static IIOMetadataNode getNode(IIOMetadataNode rootNode, String nodeName) {
        int nNodes = rootNode.getLength();
        for (int i = 0; i < nNodes; i++) {
            if (rootNode.item(i).getNodeName().compareToIgnoreCase(nodeName)== 0) {
            return((IIOMetadataNode) rootNode.item(i));
            }
       }
        IIOMetadataNode node = new IIOMetadataNode(nodeName);
        rootNode.appendChild(node);
        return(node);
  }
}
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Thanks! Are those values in milliseconds? I added the loop to get all the delayTime values for the frames. They were quite a bit smaller than I expected--If I try to do an animation in Java using those values as milliseconds it runs way too fast. Multiplying those values by 10 gives a good approximation of how I would expect it to run. –  medloh Nov 19 '13 at 18:49
    
yes, they are in milliseconds. –  Sage Nov 19 '13 at 18:51
1  
Looks like its actually in hundreths of a second. From animated GIF wiki: Many rendering programs interpret tiles or layers as animation frames and display them in sequence as an endless animation[11] with most web browsers automatically displaying the frames with a delay time of 0.1 seconds. –  medloh Nov 19 '13 at 19:03
1  
Wiki seems pretty clear on this: "The animation delay for each frame is specified in the GCE in hundredths of second." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphics_Interchange_Format –  medloh Nov 19 '13 at 19:19
    
@medloh, please disregard my previous comments. I had a hard time to get you. And yes the wiki is right as you have read them. Check this link to know how delay time actually works. –  Sage Nov 19 '13 at 20:26

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