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I have managed to find online how to overlay a normal curve to a histogram in R, but I would like to retain the normal "frequency" y-axis of a histogram. See two code segments below, and notice how in the second, the y-axis is replaced with "density". How can I keep that y-axis as "frequency", as it is in the first plot.

AS A BONUS: I'd like to mark the SD regions (up to 3 SD) on the density curve as well. How can I do this? I tried abline, but the line extends to the top of the graph and looks ugly.

g = d$mydata
hist(g)

enter image description here

g = d$mydata
    m<-mean(g)
    std<-sqrt(var(g))
    hist(g, density=20, breaks=20, prob=TRUE, 
         xlab="x-variable", ylim=c(0, 2), 
         main="normal curve over histogram")
    curve(dnorm(x, mean=m, sd=std), 
          col="darkblue", lwd=2, add=TRUE, yaxt="n")

enter image description here

See how in the image above, the y-axis is "density". I'd like to get that to be "frequency".

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2  
You could accomplish this by applying the strategy laid out in this answer –  Josh O'Brien Nov 19 '13 at 17:37
    
Although I should add that the interpretation of "Frequency" for the continuous density curve will be really unclear. –  Josh O'Brien Nov 19 '13 at 17:53
    
I understand, and am fine with that. The link you gave me works great, except it doesn't give a normal distribution but rather a density curve that has multiple inflection points. I'd like to get a normal like in the plot above. Any ideas? –  StanLe Nov 19 '13 at 17:56
1  
@StanLe just commenting to make sure you see my edit, which both apply my method to a normal density instead of an arbitrary density and add lines at the standard deviations. –  Gregor Nov 19 '13 at 20:39
    
I did, thanks a lot! –  StanLe Nov 20 '13 at 0:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a nice easy way I found:

h<-hist(g, breaks=10, density=10, col="lightgray", xlab="Accuracy", main="Overall") 
    xfit<-seq(min(g),max(g),length=40) 
    yfit<-dnorm(xfit,mean=mean(g),sd=sd(g)) 
    yfit <- yfit*diff(h$mids[1:2])*length(g) 
    lines(xfit, yfit, col="black", lwd=2)
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You just need to find the right multiplier, which can be easily calculated from the hist object.

myhist <- hist(mtcars$mpg)
multiplier <- myhist$counts / myhist$density
mydensity <- density(mtcars$mpg)
mydensity$y <- mydensity$y * multiplier[1]

plot(myhist)
lines(mydensity)

enter image description here

A more complete version, with a normal density and lines at each standard deviation away from the mean (including the mean):

myhist <- hist(mtcars$mpg)
multiplier <- myhist$counts / myhist$density
mydensity <- density(mtcars$mpg)
mydensity$y <- mydensity$y * multiplier[1]

plot(myhist)
lines(mydensity)

myx <- seq(min(mtcars$mpg), max(mtcars$mpg), length.out= 100)
mymean <- mean(mtcars$mpg)
mysd <- sd(mtcars$mpg)

normal <- dnorm(x = myx, mean = mymean, sd = mysd)
lines(myx, normal * multiplier[1], col = "blue", lwd = 2)

sd_x <- seq(mymean - 3 * mysd, mymean + 3 * mysd, by = mysd)
sd_y <- dnorm(x = sd_x, mean = mymean, sd = mysd) * multiplier[1]

segments(x0 = sd_x, y0= 0, x1 = sd_x, y1 = sd_y, col = "firebrick4", lwd = 2)
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