Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write some python that will take an existing list, and create a new list containing two entries for every entry in the original.

Example: Every entry should produce two new entries: x+1, and 3x.

a = [1]
a = [2, 3]
a = [3, 6, 4, 9]
a = [4, 9, 7, 18, 5, 12, 10, 27]

What code could be entered to produce the desired output:

a = [1]
for i in range(3):
    a = ???

I have tried:

a = [(x+1, 3*x) for x in a]

... but this was incorrect because the first iteration gives a list containing a single tuple:

a = [(2, 3)]

... and a subsequent iteration does not work.

In addition to the answer, some explanation into the thought process that produces the answer would be most helpful.

EDIT: If anyone can give me some insight as to why my question is receiving close votes, I would appreciate that as well.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a pretty efficient solution that uses itertools.chain.from_iterable and a generator expression:

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> a = [1]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable((x+1, x*3) for x in a))
[2, 3]
>>> a = [2, 3]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable((x+1, x*3) for x in a))
[3, 6, 4, 9]
>>> a = [3, 6, 4, 9]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable((x+1, x*3) for x in a))
[4, 9, 7, 18, 5, 12, 10, 27]
>>>

The links provided should explain everything except the list(...) part. I did that so the results were lists and not something like <itertools.chain object at 0x01815370>.


Edit in response to comment:

Yes, you can chain as many chain objects as you want and then convert the whole thing to a list in the end. See a demonstration below:

>>> a = [3, 6, 4, 9]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable((chain.from_iterable((x+1, x*3) for x in a), chain.from_iterable((x+1, x*3) for x in a))))
[4, 9, 7, 18, 5, 12, 10, 27, 4, 9, 7, 18, 5, 12, 10, 27]
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to chain chains together without first forcing each intermediate result to a list -- and only force the final result to a list? Will this be more efficient? –  CSJ Nov 19 '13 at 18:27
    
@CSJ - Yes, you can do that. See my edit. –  iCodez Nov 19 '13 at 18:31
def somefunc(n):
  if not n:
    return [1]
  else:
    return list(itertools.chain.from_iterable([(i+1, 3*i) for i in somefunc(n-1)]))

Output:

In [20]: somefunc(3)
Out[20]: [4, 9, 7, 18, 5, 12, 10, 27]

In [21]: somefunc(2)
Out[21]: [3, 6, 4, 9]

In [22]: somefunc(1)
Out[22]: [2, 3]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.