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I'm trying to learn java better and I got one question.

Say I got two collections, an ArrayList and a LinkedHashSet. Is it possible to make a function like this:

void print(collection c) {
    for (object tmp:c) {
        System.out.println(tmp);
    }
}
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2  
Just capitalize Collection and Object and then you're done. –  Steve Kuo Jan 5 '10 at 18:50
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Watch your capitalization:

private void printCollection(Collection collection) {

   for (Object obj : collection) {
      System.out.println(obj);
   }
}
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1  
Should be for(Object obj : c) –  Felix Kling Jan 5 '10 at 17:38
1  
Seconds too late. Should be Collection<?>, and element or e instead of obj. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 5 '10 at 17:40
1  
Make sure you implement the toString() method –  Brendan Jan 5 '10 at 18:22
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Yes. ArrayList and LinkedHashSet are both Collections. The method that you wrote accepts a Collection (note the capital C) so it will accept any type of collection. This is referred to as polymorphism.

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It is possible, as both types implement Collection<E>. The convention is for class types in Java to start with a capital letter. Since 1.5, Java has used generics for its collections and you should use them in all new code. Since you're using the 1.5 style for loop, you should write generic code.

It's usually better to make functions operate on the least specific type as possible, as this gives the widest reuse. In this case, you only need something wich could go one up from Collection<T> to Iterable<T>, as you only need something which will work with the for loop. So combining generics and least power gives:

public class PrintLinePrinter {
    public <T> void print (Iterable<T> collection) { 
        for (T item : collection) {
            System.out.println(item); 
        }
    } 
} 
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1  
The T is unnecessary. just do public void print (Iterable<?> collection) and change T item to Object item –  user102008 Aug 31 '11 at 4:01
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System.out.println(Collection c) already print any type of collection in readable format. But if collection contains user defined objects , then you need to implement toString() in user defined class.

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'Loop free' solution:

void print(collection c) {
    System.out.println( Arrays.toString(c.toArray())); }
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basically you just need ot use the iterator:

void print(collection c) 
{ 
    for (object tmp:c.iterator()) 
    { 
        System.out.println(tmp); 
    } 
} 
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3  
In Java, iterators are not iterable. You can only use for-each on iterables, not iterators. –  Chris Jester-Young Jan 5 '10 at 17:43
    
ack, true. but who was the genious who decided that? :) –  John Gardner Jan 5 '10 at 19:22
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