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I am trying to directly access integer from a pointer class, by overloading * operator, but it seems VC++ 10 is not allowing it. Kindly help:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>
using namespace std;
int MAX7 = 10;

struct node{
    int value;
    node *next;
};
struct node *head = NULL;
struct node *current = NULL;
int count = 0;

class SmartPointer{
public:
    SmartPointer(){
    }
    int push(int i){
        if(count == MAX7)   return 0;

        if(head == NULL){
            head = new node();
            current = head;
            head -> next = NULL;
            head -> value = i;
            count = 1;
        }
        else{
            struct node *ptr = head;
            while(ptr->next != NULL)    ptr = ptr->next;
            ptr->next = new node;
            ptr = ptr->next;
            ptr->next = NULL;
            ptr->value = i;
            count++;
        }
        return 1;
    }
    void Display(){
        node *ptr = head;
        while(ptr != NULL){
            cout << ptr->value << "(" << ptr << ")";
            if( ptr == current )
                cout << "*";
            cout << ", ";
            ptr = ptr->next;
        } 
    }

    int operator *(){
        if(current == NULL) return -1;
        struct node *ptr = current;
        return ptr->value;
    }
};

int main(){
    SmartPointer *sp;
    sp = new SmartPointer();
    sp->push(99);
    for(int i=100; i<120; i++){
        if(sp->push(i))
            cout << "\nPushing ("<<i<<"): Successful!";
        else
            cout << "\nPushing ("<<i<<"): Failed!";
    }
    cout << "\n";
    sp->Display();

    int i = *sp;

    getch();
    return 0;
}

Error# 1>test7.cpp(71): error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'SmartPointer' to 'int' 1> No user-defined-conversion operator available that can perform this conversion, or the operator cannot be called

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

short answer:

int i = **sp;

You should not allocate objects with new. Your code looks like java. In C++, you must delete everything you allocate with new. In C++ you can write:

SmartPointer sp;
sp.push(99);
int i = *sp;
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Thank you. I got it, I was implementing it wrongly :) –  user3010514 Nov 19 '13 at 20:45

sp is not a smart pointer - it's a plain old dumb pointer to SmartPointer class. *sp uses built-in dereference operator, producing an lvalue of SmartPointer type. It does not call SmartPointer::operator*() - for that, you need to write **sp (two stars).

It's not at all clear why you want to allocate SmartPointer instance on the heap. That's an unusual thing to want to do (also too, you leak it). I'm pretty sure you would be better off with

SmartPointer sp;
sp.push(99);

and so on.

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