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HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
</div>

I want to have three columns that are made off elements 1 to 3, 4 to 6 and 7 to 9. As you could see in the fiddle, I've managed to make the first two columns. However the third column unexpectedly falls down ? Does anybody know why the crimson boxes are not starting at the top right corner of the container even though they are floated right ?

http://jsfiddle.net/AleKS/e8G2C/

EDIT: I SHOULD CLARIFY, the HTML can't be changed!

EDIT2: Also a JS solution is ok, but it shouldn't be too long.

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1  
+1 for use of cornflowerblue –  cantera Nov 19 '13 at 20:57
    
try playing around with css-column, eg: jsfiddle.net/8FLWZ –  stackErr Nov 19 '13 at 21:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given that this is almost like cheating, but if the deadline is approaching etc, etc.

Using javascript + jquery, it's rather trivial to insert three column divs around 1/3s of boxes.

This allows you to float the .col's instead of the boxes and all is kind of well.

var boxes = $(".container > .box");

var firstCol = boxes.length / 3;
var secondCol = 2 * firstCol;
var thirdCol = boxes.length;

(boxes.slice(0, firstCol)).wrapAll('<div class="col"></div>');
(boxes.slice(firstCol, secondCol)).wrapAll('<div class="col"></div>');
(boxes.slice(secondCol, thirdCol)).wrapAll('<div class="col"></div>');

I'll repeat for clarity that yea, this is a bit hackish, but the CSS solutions is also rather hackish for this sort of issue. Make sure that it dosen't look like horseshit on the off chance of js failing/disabled.

http://jsfiddle.net/Prjjb/

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Does anybody know why the crimson boxes are not starting at the top right corner of the container even though they are floated right ?

Yeah - when you float elements, they don't automatically move UP. They float left or right, but at the same vertical level that they would have been if they were not floated. If you remove the floats from those divs, you can see that their natural position is below the other elements, so that's where they stay even after they are floated right.

You'll need to change the HTML structure (add some column divs) if you really want to do what you are trying to do.

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yes I've concluded this also, but may be if someone could explain why exactly this happens, may be I could trick it somehow :) Also a JS solution is also ok, however it shouldn't be too long ? –  Aleksandar Ivanov Nov 20 '13 at 9:10

I believe the best solution here for you is to wrap each set of boxes in a another element. This should work better across browsers and cuts down the number of floated elements on the page. The less elements out of flow, the better.

Your elements should be positioned properly by adding column like so:

<div class="column">
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
    <div class="box"></div>
</div> 

Here's a demo : http://jsfiddle.net/e8G2C/1/

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I have an alternative which doesn't use floats. You could use box-sizing (supported in all good browsers and IE8+ - see CanIUse - box sizing) and make them all 33% width with display: inline-block. Ensure that you use the -webkit- and -moz- prefixes too, and make sure these are before the box-sizing property.

Note that you would have to ensure there is no white-space between the "cells" (else browsers will put a space between them) - you can do this in 2 ways I know of, either by putting the opening tag on the same line as the previous closing tag or putting an html comment at the end of each closing tag with the closing comment before the start tag:

<div class="box">
    ...
</div><div class="box">
    ...
</div>

OR...

<div class="box">
    ...
</div><!--
--><div class="box">
    ...
</div>

This should achieve the layout you're looking for without those nasty floats.

Edit: One advantage of having all cells in one div (rather than having column or row wrappers) is that you can use @media queries to display different numbers of columns based on viewport size. This would be good if you have a set of articles or icons which bear no relation to one another.

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unfortunately the HTML can't change. The only tool at my disposal is CSS and may be JS if its not too long :) –  Aleksandar Ivanov Nov 20 '13 at 9:04
    
Well since jQuery is ok, you should be able to just create another div after the wrapper and the append all of the box divs to that. Something like (untested) $(".container").hide().after("<div class='container'></div>"); $(".container:visible").append($(".box"));. This should equally get rid of any white space from new lines etc. –  ClarkeyBoy Nov 20 '13 at 17:55

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