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Given a stored procedure in SQL Server which has multiple select statements, is there a way to work with those results separately while calling the procedure?

For example:

alter procedure dbo.GetSomething
as
begin
    select * from dbo.Person;
    select * from dbo.Car;
end;

In .NET, if I call this proc, I can use a SqlDataReader to move between the two result sets, so I can easily retrieve all people and cars. In SQL however, when I execute the proc directly, I get both result sets.

If I call:

insert @myTempTable
    exec dbo.GetSomething;

Then it errors because the column definition doesn't match. If by some chance Person and Car have the same columns, it concatenates the two together, and @myTempTable gets all records from both tables, which obviously is no good either.

I can define new custom types representing the two result sets, and make those output parameters instead of having the multiple select statements, but I'm wondering if there's a better way - some way of pulling both results into temporary tables, or looping through the results, or something.

EDIT

Actually, after looking more closely, even output table parameters won't solve this - they're readonly, and that's still true in SQL 2012. (Connect ticket asking for this to be added)

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1  
No. If you want to work with a single result set from one procedure, then you can only be returning one result set. –  Kermit Nov 19 '13 at 21:56
    
Surprisingly, you can access multiple result sets from an ADO.NET app using SqlDataReader as you mentioned - but you cannot access multiple result sets from T-SQL ..... never made sense to me, but that's the way it is (at least for now) –  marc_s Nov 19 '13 at 22:00
    
Say you have a column called 'type' on both Car and Person table, the new table can't have 2 columns named 'type'. It is possible that you explicitly list the column names on 1 of the selects, e.g. SELECT type AS carType from Car. –  Emmad Kareem Nov 19 '13 at 22:23
    
@EmmadKareem It doesn't create one big result set with both sets of columns - rather if the two queries happen to have the same columns, you get a unioned result set when you select from the proc. Even that would only potentially be useful when I want the two queries to give identical types of results. The idea is these two queries give totally unrelated results, different number and types and names of columns. –  Joe Enos Nov 19 '13 at 22:30
    
Thanks for clarification, I re-read your text, I was thinking of somersetting else. –  Emmad Kareem Nov 19 '13 at 22:33

5 Answers 5

In TSQL land, you're stuck.

Here is a trick (some may call semi-hacky) way that I used one time.

/*  START TSQL CODE */

/*  Stored Procedure Definition */

Use Northwind
GO


IF EXISTS 
    (
    SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
    WHERE ROUTINE_TYPE = N'PROCEDURE' and ROUTINE_SCHEMA = N'dbo' and ROUTINE_NAME = N'uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId'  
    )
BEGIN
    DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId]
END


GO

CREATE Procedure dbo.uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId
(
  @CustomerID nchar(5)
, @ResultSetIndicator smallint = 0
)
AS

BEGIN

    SET NOCOUNT ON



    /* ResultSet #1 */

    if (@ResultSetIndicator = 0 OR @ResultSetIndicator = 1)
    BEGIN 
        SELECT 
            c.CustomerID, c.CompanyName /*,c.ContactName,c.ContactTitle,c.[Address],c.City,c.Region,c.PostalCode,c.Country ,c.Phone,c.Fax */
        FROM 
            Customers c 
            JOIN Orders o ON c.CustomerID = o.CustomerID 
        WHERE 
            c.CustomerID = @CustomerID
    END


    /* */
    /* ResultSet #2 */ 

    if (@ResultSetIndicator = 0 OR @ResultSetIndicator = 2)
    BEGIN 

        SELECT o.OrderID,o.CustomerID /* ,o.EmployeeID,o.OrderDate,o.RequiredDate,o.ShippedDate,o.ShipVia ,o.Freight,o.ShipName,o.ShipAddress,o.OrderID,o.CustomerID,o.EmployeeID,o.OrderDate  */
        FROM 
            Orders o 
         WHERE 
            o.CustomerID = @CustomerID
        ORDER BY 
            o.CustomerID , o.OrderID 

    END


    /* */
    /* ResultSet #3 */

    if (@ResultSetIndicator = 0 OR @ResultSetIndicator = 3)
    BEGIN 
         SELECT od.OrderID,od.ProductID /* ,od.UnitPrice,od.Quantity,od.Discount  */
         FROM 
            [Order Details] od 
         WHERE 
            exists (select null from dbo.Orders  innerOrds where innerOrds.OrderID = od.OrderID and innerOrds.CustomerID = @CustomerID )
         ORDER BY 
            od.OrderID 

    END

    SET NOCOUNT OFF


END

GO 
/* Get everything */


exec dbo.uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId 'ALFKI'




    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TempCustomer') IS NOT NULL
    begin
            drop table #TempCustomer
    end


    CREATE TABLE #TempCustomer
    ( 
      [CustomerID] nchar(5)
    , [CompanyName] nvarchar(40)
    )

INSERT INTO #TempCustomer ( [CustomerID] , [CompanyName])
exec dbo.uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId 'ALFKI' , 1

Select * from #TempCustomer



    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TempOrders') IS NOT NULL
    begin
            drop table #TempOrders
    end


    CREATE TABLE #TempOrders
    ( 
        OrderID int
      , [CustomerID] nchar(5)

    )

INSERT INTO #TempOrders ( OrderID , [CustomerID] )
exec dbo.uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId 'ALFKI' , 2

Select * from #TempOrders






    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TempOrderDetails') IS NOT NULL
    begin
            drop table #TempOrderDetails
    end


    CREATE TABLE #TempOrderDetails
    ( 
        OrderID int
      , [ProductID] int

    )

INSERT INTO #TempOrderDetails ( OrderID , [ProductID] )
exec dbo.uspOrderDetailsByCustomerId 'ALFKI' , 3

Select * from #TempOrderDetails


    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TempOrderDetails') IS NOT NULL
    begin
            drop table #TempOrders
    end


    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TempOrders') IS NOT NULL
    begin
            drop table #TempOrders
    end



    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TempCustomer') IS NOT NULL
    begin
            drop table #TempCustomer
    end
share|improve this answer
    
That's an interesting idea, thanks. A little bit hackish as you mention, but looks like it would work. –  Joe Enos Nov 20 '13 at 20:40
    
I used it one time, on some code I inherited. I def do NOT recommend it as a best practice. But it works. –  granadaCoder Nov 20 '13 at 20:48

While this does not appear to be supported natively in T-SQL, if using a CLR Stored Procedure is an option for you, then you should be able to create a Stored Procedure in your preferred .Net language that uses the SqlDataReader.NextResult() method to advance to the desired result set and then send the SqlDataReader back via the SqlPipe.Send(SqlDataReader) method. You would just need to pass in the SQL to execute and the desired result set as parameters to this proc.

This would allow you to work with the proc as is, without modifying it to send back all or only one result set.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - not a huge fan of CLR procs just because they're a pain to work with, but that sounds like an interesting approach. –  Joe Enos Nov 20 '13 at 20:43

Der. Read the whole question before writing an answer! :-P

If you're trying to work with the results in TSQL land you're going to need to use some way to keep the results separate. Writing results to Temp tables is possibly your best bet since you won't need to depend on columns lining up (or not, as the case may be) and can deal with the data in a "natural" fashion for SQL Server. E.g.

create proc test_something
as begin
    select a, b into temp1 from table1
    select b, c into temp2 from table2
end
go

exec dbo.test_something()

select * from temp1
select * from temp2
share|improve this answer
    
This will not work unless temp1 and temp2 are created outside of the proc, before the proc is called. Temp tables created within a sub-process are dropped when returning to the calling process. –  srutzky Nov 20 '13 at 19:11
    
This does work for me in SQL Server 2008. There's no need to create temp1 and temp2 outside of the proc since they're not actually temp tables, they're real tables. Of course, now you have to clean up after yourself... And, as always, YMMV. :) –  Steve G Dec 4 '13 at 20:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems like there's no good simple way to do this, without a hack or a major paradigm shift. It looks like the best way is to just split out the original procs and end up with one more proc than before:

Old way:

create procedure dbo.GetSomething
as
begin
    select * from dbo.Person;
    select * from dbo.Car;
end;

New way:

create procedure dbo.GetPeople
as
begin
    select * from dbo.Person;
end;

create procedure dbo.GetCars
as
begin
    select * from dbo.Car;
end;

-- This gives the same result as before
create procedure dbo.GetSomething
as
begin
    exec dbo.GetPeople;
    exec dbo.GetCars;
end;

Then when I'm in a different proc and need both result sets, I'd just have to call them one at a time.

share|improve this answer
String myConnString  = "User ID="username";password="password";Initial Catalog=pubs;Data Source=Server";
SqlConnection myConnection = new SqlConnection(myConnString);
SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand();
SqlDataReader myReader ;

myCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
myCommand.Connection = myConnection;
myCommand.CommandText = "MyProc";

try
{
    myConnection.Open();
    myReader = myCommand.ExecuteReader();

    while (myReader.Read())
    {
        //Write logic to process data for the first result.   
        }

    myReader.NextResult();
    while (myReader.Read())
    {
        //Write logic to process data for the second result.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
myReader.NextResult(); //is return the second result data –  Mahesh Gaikwad Dec 18 at 9:59

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