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When a single ClientBase<T> instance is used for multiple WCF service calls, it can get a channel into a faulted state (ie. when the service is down).

I would like to heal the channel automatically when the service comes up again. The only way I found is to call the following code before each method call:

if (clientBase.InnerChannel.State == CommunicationState.Faulted)
{
      clientBase.Abort();
      ((IDisposable)clientBase).Dispose();
      clientBase = new SampleServiceClientBase();
}

I got the feeling that this isn't the right way to do it. Anyone got a better idea?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can't. Once a channel is faulted, it's faulted for good. You must create a new channel. WCF channels are stateful (in a manner of speaking), so a faulted channel means the state may be corrupted.

What you can do is put the logic you're using into a utility method:

public static class Service<T> where T : ICommunicationObject, new()
{
    public static void AutoRepair(ref T co)
    {
        AutoRepair(ref co, () => new T());
    }

    public static void AutoRepair(ref T co, Func<T> createMethod)
    {
        if ((co != null) && (co.State == CommunicationState.Faulted))
        {
            co.Abort();
            co = null;
        }
        if (co == null)
        {
            co = createMethod();
        }
    }
}

Then you can invoke your service with the following:

Service<SampleServiceClient>.AutoRepair(ref service,
    () => new SampleServiceClient(someParameter));
service.SomeMethod();

Or if you want to use the default parameterless constructor, just:

Service<SampleServiceClient>.AutoRepair(ref service);
service.SomeMethod();

Since it also handles the case where the service is null, you don't need to initialize the service before calling it.

Pretty much the best I can offer. Maybe somebody else has a better way.

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1  
Do you need T also to implement IDisposable? –  David Gardiner Aug 23 '12 at 4:30
    
@DavidGardiner: Not if it implements ICommunicationObject. The Dispose implementation on WCF channels is actually part of the problem. –  Aaronaught Aug 23 '12 at 23:54
1  
@DavidGardiner: The Dispose method shouldn't have been in my example, I removed it. Calling Dispose on communication objects is well-documented to be wrong, as it just calls Close internally when you actually want to call Abort on a fault (as above). Unless you're implementing your own communication objects, you don't need to concern yourself with IDisposable here. There's a more detailed example in an interceptor implementation I wrote –  Aaronaught Aug 24 '12 at 2:02
1  
thank you. Actually co = null, throws an exception and suggests to replace null with default(co). I did uncomment that line. –  SwissCoder Oct 18 '12 at 8:48
1  
@SwissCoder: You might need to add the class constraint to the generic definition in that case. No need to change the code, as there are no structs that implement ICommunicationObject. –  Aaronaught Oct 20 '12 at 0:16

This is what I'm currently doing, but I can't say this is the best option either.

I recreate the proxy when an exception is caught on the call.

try
{
    ListCurrentProcesses();
}
catch (TypeLoadException ex)
{
    Debug.Print("Oops: " + ex.Message);
    m_Proxy = new ProcessManagerProxy();
}
catch (EndpointNotFoundException endpointEX)
{
    Debug.Print("Oops: " + endpointEX.Message);
    m_Proxy = new ProcessManagerProxy();
}
catch (CommunicationException communicationEx)
{
    Debug.Print("Oops: " + communicationEx.Message);
    m_Proxy = new ProcessManagerProxy();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Never catch SystemException, especially if you're not re-throwing. That tree includes instances like OutOfMemoryException and StackOverflowException. Also, you're not properly disposing of the old channel here. –  Aaronaught Jan 5 '10 at 19:51
    
Understood. That was just a quick example. Do you see a big problem letting the channel get collected instead of explicitly disposing it? I'm assuming we are not going to retry this operation 1000 times before we give up. –  Scott P Jan 5 '10 at 19:54
    
I tried it and it caused more problems –  Jader Dias Jan 5 '10 at 20:08
    
@Scott P: The ClientBase<TChannel> class does not seem to have a finalizer on it that would invoke Close or Abort, so I would say, yes, it is a problem if you never call Dispose (or Close or Abort); it's probably leaking network resources. –  Aaronaught Jan 5 '10 at 21:55
    
Cool. That makes sense. –  Scott P Jan 5 '10 at 22:38

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