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I have a table - let's call it MASTER - with a lot of rows in it. Now, I had to created another table called 'MASTER_DETAILS', which will be populated with data from another system. These data will be accessed via DB Link.

MASTER has a FK to MASTER_DETAIL (1 -> 1 Relationship).

I created a SQL to populate MASTER_DETAILS:

INSERT INTO MASTER_DETAILS(ID, DETAIL1, DETAILS2, BLAH)
    WITH QUERY_FROM_EXTERNAL_SYSTEM AS (
       SELECT IDENTIFIER,
              FIELD1,
              FIELD2,
              FIELD3
       FROM TABLE@DB_LINK 
       --- DOZENS OF INNERS AND OUTER JOINS HERE
    ) SELECT MASTER_DETAILS_SEQ.NEXTVAL, 
             QES.FIELD1, 
             QES.FIELD2, 
             QES.FIELD3
      FROM MASTER M
      INNER JOIN QUERY_FROM_EXTERNAL_SYSTEM QES ON QES.IDENTIFIER = M.ID
      --- DOZENS OF JOINS HERE

Approach above works fine to insert all the values into the MASTER_DETAILS.

Problem is:

In the approach above, I cannot insert the value of MASTER_DETAILS_SEQ.CURRVAL into the MASTER table. So I create all the entries into the DETAILS table but I don't link them to the MASTER table.

Does anyone see a way out to this problem using only a INSERT statement? I wish I could avoid creating a complex script with LOOPS and everything to handle this problem.

Ideally I want to do something like this:

  INSERT INTO MASTER_DETAILS(ID, DETAIL1, DETAILS2, BLAH) AND MASTER(MASTER_DETAILS_ID)
    WITH QUERY_FROM_EXTERNAL_SYSTEM AS (
       SELECT IDENTIFIER,
              FIELD1,
              FIELD2,
              FIELD3
       FROM TABLE@DB_LINK 
       --- DOZENS OF INNERS AND OUTER JOINS HERE
    ) SELECT MASTER_DETAILS_SEQ.NEXTVAL, 
             QES.FIELD1, 
             QES.FIELD2, 
             QES.FIELD3
      FROM MASTER M
      INNER JOIN QUERY_FROM_EXTERNAL_SYSTEM QES ON QES.IDENTIFIER = M.ID
      --- DOZENS OF JOINS HERE,
      SELECT MASTER_DETAILS_SEQ.CURRVAL FROM DUAL; 

I know this is completly invalid in Oracle - but I put this SQL in there just to illustrate what I want to do.

Thanks.

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You can create a temporary trigger that will populate you MASTER table as you insert data in your master_detail table from the external system. Once all data inserted you can drop the trigger –  cha Nov 20 '13 at 4:00
1  
The relationship seems the wrong way round. If it will only ever be 1-to-1, why have a separate table at all; and if you must, why does the master have the FK? And if it might later be 1-to-many, well, it won't work. Why aren't you leaving the master table alone, and adding an (indexed) FK to the detail table, which you can just populate during your insert with M.ID? I'm not sure if I'm missing something... –  Alex Poole Nov 20 '13 at 8:58
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1 Answer

If there is really a 1-to-1 relationship between the two tables, then they could arguably be a single table. Presumably you have a reason to want to keep them separate. Perhaps the master is a vendor-supplied table you shouldn't touch and the detail is extra data; but then you're changing the master anyway by adding the foreign key field. Or perhaps the detail will be reloaded periodically and you don't want to update the master table; but then you have to update the foreign key field anyway. I'll assume you're required to have a separate table, for whatever reason.

If you put a foreign key on the master table that refers to the primary key on the detail table, you're are restricted to it only ever being a 1-to-1 relationship. If that really is the case then conceptually it shouldn't matter which way the relationship is built - which table has the primary key and which has the foreign key. And if it isn't then your model will break when your detail table (or the remote query) comes back with two rows related to the same master - even if you're sure that won't happen today, will it always be true? The pluralisation of the name master_details suggests that might be expected. Maybe. Having the relationship the other way would prevent that being an issue.

I'm guessing you decided to put the relationship that way round so you can join the tables using the detail's key:

select m.column, md.column
from master m
join master_details md on md.id = m.detail_id

... because you expect that to be the quickest way, since md.id will be indexed (implicitly, as a primary key). But you could achieve the same effect by adding the master ID to the details table as a foreign key:

select m.column, md.column
from master m
join master_details md on md.master_id = m.id

It is good practice to index foreign keys anyway, and as long as you have an index on master_details.master_id then the performance should be the same (more or less, other factors may come in to play but I'd expect this to generally be the case). This would also allow multiple detail records in the future, without needing to modify the schema.

So as a simple example, let's say you have a master table created and populated with some dummy data:

create table master(id number, data varchar2(10),
  constraint pk_master primary key (id));

create sequence seq_master start with 42;

insert into master (id, data)
values (seq_master.nextval, 'Foo ' || seq_master.nextval);
insert into master (id, data)
values (seq_master.nextval, 'Foo ' || seq_master.nextval);
insert into master (id, data)
values (seq_master.nextval, 'Foo ' || seq_master.nextval);

select * from master;

        ID DATA     
---------- ----------
        42 Foo 42    
        43 Foo 43    
        44 Foo 44    

The changes you've proposed might look like this:

create table detail (id number, other_data varchar2(10),
  constraint pk_detail primary key(id));

create sequence seq_detail;

alter table master add (detail_id number,
  constraint fk_master_detail foreign key (detail_id) 
    references detail (id));

insert into detail (id, other_data)
select seq_detail.nextval, 'Foo ' || seq_detail.nextval
from master m
-- joins etc
;

... plus the update of the master's foreign key, which is what you're struggling with, so let's do that manually for now:

update master set detail_id = 1 where id = 42;
update master set detail_id = 2 where id = 43;
update master set detail_id = 3 where id = 44;

And then you'd query as:

select m.data, d.other_data
from master m
join detail d on d.id = m.detail_id
where m.id = 42;

DATA       OTHER_DATA
---------- ----------
Foo 42     Bar 1      

Plan hash value: 2192253142

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name      | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |           |     1 |    22 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                |           |     1 |    22 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| MASTER    |     1 |    13 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |    INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PK_MASTER |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   4 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| DETAIL    |     3 |    27 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |    INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PK_DETAIL |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you swap the relationship around the changes become:

create table detail (id number, master_id, other_data varchar2(10),
  constraint pk_detail primary key(id),
  constraint fk_detail_master foreign key (master_id)
    references master (id));

create index ix_detail_master_id on detail (master_id);

create sequence seq_detail;

insert into detail (id, master_id, other_data)
select seq_detail.nextval, m.id, 'Bar ' || seq_detail.nextval
from master m
-- joins etc.
;

No update of the master table is needed, and the query becomes:

select m.data, d.other_data
from master m
join detail d on d.master_id = m.id
where m.id = 42;

DATA       OTHER_DATA
---------- ----------
Foo 42     Bar 1      

Plan hash value: 4273661231

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                    | Name                | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |                     |     1 |    19 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS                |                     |     1 |    19 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| MASTER              |     1 |    10 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |    INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PK_MASTER           |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   4 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| DETAIL              |     1 |     9 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN          | IX_DETAIL_MASTER_ID |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The only real difference in the plan is that you now have a range scan instead of a unique scan; if you're really sure it's 1-to-1 you could make the index unique but there's not much benefit.

SQL Fiddle of this approach.

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