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First off, I am new at testing, so this may be a dumb question. I am currently creating unit tests for my classes. I have one property that depending on a nullable property will send off a new Comment object to the database. Usually with unit testing I would just make sure an object got sent to my Mock Service, and call it good. However, would it not make more sense to test the values on the Comment Object to make sure it is going down the correct path, instead of just assuming it did. Here is a sample of the code I am testing:

if (DeliveryDate != null)
{
   AddPartHistory("Delivery Date Changed from " + ((DateTime)DeliveryDate).ToShortDateString() + " to " + ((DateTime)value).ToShortDateString());
}
else
{
   AddPartHistory("Delivered Date of " + ((DateTime)value).ToShortDateString() + " was added.");
}

The AddPartHistory function sends the Comment object (which holds the text in a Property called Entry) to the database (or to a Mock Service during test), and stores it in a Property called NewPartHistory. And here is the code that I believe may be more of an integration test:

vm.DeliveryDate = DateTime.UtcNow;
Assert.AreEqual("Delivered Date of " + ((DateTime)vm.DeliveryDate).ToShortDateString() + " was added.", vm.NewPartHistory.Entry);

OldDeliveryDate = vm.DeliveryDate;
vm.DeliveryDate = DateTime.UtcNow;
Assert.AreEqual("Delivery Date Changed from " + ((DateTime)OldDeliveryDate).ToShortDateString() + " to " + ((DateTime)vm.DeliveryDate).ToShortDateString(), vm.NewPartHistory.Entry);

So, back to the question, should I leave this code in the unit test, or move to integration test.

Update:

Since there was a lot of talk about my AddPartHistory Method, here it is. It simply fills out the standard data for a PartHistory (which is always the same), adds the Entry, and then updates a Listview with new data:

private void AddPartHistory(string historyText)
{
   NewPartHistory = new CdaService.PartHistory();
   NewPartHistory.EnteredBy = User.Current.UID;
   NewPartHistory.Entry = historyText;
   NewPartHistory.EntryDate = DateTime.UtcNow;
   NewPartHistory.PartId = ThisPart.Id;
   webService.Insert(NewPartHistory);
   GetPartHistory();
}
share|improve this question
    
It seems to me that you are doing both, are you not? You are asserting that your expected and actual are what they are supposed to be, aren't you? To me, an assert is a rare case that can not only be a unit test, but an integration test as well. Unit - because you are unit test code at one level, and integration - because you are comparing your unit test with data returned one level deeper. –  Brian Nov 19 '13 at 23:46
    
I see what you are saying, but in a true integration test I would actually send to the database, and retrieve back correct? –  Daryl Behrens Nov 19 '13 at 23:49
    
In most cases, yes you would. But, not in all cases. I think the mechanism you have implemented is a pretty solid one. But, if you are a bit nervous about it, you could always just pass your comment object to AddPartHistory and see how it is constructed, perhaps? –  Brian Nov 19 '13 at 23:51
    
I have added AddPartHistory Method to the question. Let me know what you think. I guess I am a little confused on the difference between Unit Test and Integration Test. –  Daryl Behrens Nov 19 '13 at 23:55
    
At the 50,000 foot view (and this is very subjective), a unit test tests a block of code (most often a function/method). An integration test, on the other hand, tests not only the function/method, but also what that method accepts (if overloaded) and how it interacts with layers both above, below and around it. –  Brian Nov 19 '13 at 23:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would change it to pass in the new Comment object to the AddPartHistory method - instead of passing it the values to build the object. That way you can unit test the logic including the construction of the comment object. It would also be helpful to return the comment object from AddPartHistory to make it easier to assert.

Move this out of the method like this:

   NewPartHistory = new CdaService.PartHistory();
   NewPartHistory.EnteredBy = User.Current.UID;
   NewPartHistory.EntryDate = DateTime.UtcNow;
   NewPartHistory.PartId = ThisPart.Id;

   if()
   {  
      NewPartHistory.Entry = "Delivered Date of"......;
      return AddPartHistory(NewPartHistory );
   }
   else
   {
       NewPartHistory.Entry = "Delivery Date Changed from".....;
       return AddPartHistory(NewPartHistory );
   }

   //return comment object from AddPartHistory so that you can call this entire method and assert all properties
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer mirrors my comments, +1 :) –  Brian Nov 19 '13 at 23:54
    
I have added my AddPartHistory Method and explained why I have it, if you could please go into a little more detail I would appreciate it, since I don't fully understand how to implement what you are saying. –  Daryl Behrens Nov 19 '13 at 23:56
1  
@DarylBehrens I am suggesting that you take the construction of the comment object out of the AddPartHistory method to better test the construction. –  TGH Nov 20 '13 at 0:00
    
You can then pass in the method to the function and even return it back out –  TGH Nov 20 '13 at 0:02
    
I am really sorry, I just dont see how that will help, no offense. I use that block of code about 15 times in the view model. I used to have it hard coded in every Property setter, but figured for code reuse it would be better to move to a Method. How will this help me from my unit test, where the end result is the same no matter where I put the statments. Sorry again, I just really dont get it (my fault not yours). –  Daryl Behrens Nov 20 '13 at 0:08

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