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I'm making a very basic game in C# and using a class diagram as a guide.

I have a Building class and a Room Class. On my diagram it says that Room inherits from Building, So Building is the super class in this case.

My Building Class contains the set-up array to hold the rooms

public class building // Building Object Class
{
    const int SizeConst = 4; 
    private int[,] Cells; 

    public int[,] create() 
    {
        Cells = new int[SizeConst, SizeConst]; 
        return Cells;
    }
}

Room is exactly the same although it would be nice to be able to change the size constant indipendantly.

For example, The Size Constant of the Building could stay at 4 giving 25 rooms. But what if I wanted to change the Size constant for Room to 5 to get 36 movement spaces?

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1  
You can change constant to virtual getter with hardcoded value. You can find how to do that there: stackoverflow.com/questions/770437/… – vmeln Nov 20 '13 at 10:01
    
Thats great, Thank you for your help – Harvey Nov 20 '13 at 10:07
1  
Got to say Room inherits from building seems a bad move. Both having a common ancestor, or using an interface, should leave you with a better a design. Buildings have rooms, doesn't mean rooms are buildings. – Tony Hopkinson Nov 20 '13 at 10:09
    
I see what you mean, I'm pretty new to UML and class diagrams and find them incredibly confusing. Do you think they should be separate objects entirely? – Harvey Nov 20 '13 at 10:14
    
Can't say from here, but the rule for inheritance versus aggregation is Is a ? a ? or has a ? a ?. So is a room a building? No, Does a building have a room? Yes. What common behaviours persuaded you to inheritance. They are both locations? If so perhaps Building and room should be a Location, or perhaps they should both implement ILocatable – Tony Hopkinson Nov 20 '13 at 17:36

You can't override a constant (that wouldn't make it a constant anymore). You should provide a virtual getter or a method:

    public class building // Building Object Class
    {
        protected virtual int Size{ get;}
        private int[,] Cells; 

        public int[,] create() 
        {
            Cells = new int[Size, Size]; 
            return Cells;
         }
    }

    public class Room
    {
        protected virtual int Size
        {
             get
             {
                 // return custom value here
             }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Basically you cannot change the constant, but instead of this I advice you use polymorphism and create virtual property or method that will return the desired value.

For example:

public class Building
{
    public virtual int CellCount { get { return 5; } }
}

public class Room : Building
{
    public override int CellCount { get { return 6; } }
}

Hope this helps.

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