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I have 2 dynamic library: dllA and dllB

dllA puts (char* type) to 1 function of dllB and this function alloc memory for char* type and return result to dllA.

DLLB:

getResult(char *rs)
{
     // calculate to get length
     rs = new char[lenght];
     rs = .... // do something here
}

dllA get result, do something with output and release rs.

DLLA:

getResult(char *rs);
std::cout << rs;
// can not release rs here
if(rs){
     delete []rs;
} // crash here

But I can not release char* type maybe because memory of char* type is in memory from dllB and we can not access to this memory space.

If I build with debug-mode, it works normally. And it causes error with release-mode

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Typically, you need to free memory in the same module it was allocated. –  Vasily Biryukov Nov 20 '13 at 12:00

5 Answers 5

Each DLL typically implements its own heap tracking so memory allocated by one DLL must be deallocated by the same DLL. This is typically done by providing a corresponding free function. I.e. in your example above you might do the following (also note that the rs parameter must be passed as a pointer to a pointer so that we can return a value in it):

DllB :

void getResult(char **rs)
{
     // calculate to get length
     *rs = new char[lenght];
     rs = .... // do something here
}
void freeResult(char* rs)
{
    delete [] rs;
}

DllA :

getResult(char *rs);
std::cout << rs;
freeResult(rs); // don't crash here :-)

To make sure DllA always calls freeResult you can wrap it in a smart pointer such as the boost::shared_ptr or std::shared_ptr (though I haven't tested std::shared_ptr):

DllB :

char* getResult()
{
     // calculate to get length
     char* rs = new char[length];
     rs = .... // do something here
     return rs;
}
void freeResult(char* rs)
{
    delete [] rs;
}

DllA :

shared_ptr<char> rs(getResult(), freeResult);
std::cout << rs;
// no need to free rs here, the shared_ptr will do it automatically.
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Thanks,SketchyLizard.It 's useful for me. –  quanrock Nov 21 '13 at 2:34
    
This is not typical, precisely because of the hassle produced. –  MSalters Nov 21 '13 at 9:32

The memory manager on Windows is part of the C runtime library, so if both DLLs use the same C runtime library for their new[]/delete[] calls, it works just fine: both calls are done in different DLLs, but they both use the same copy of the CRT DLL which does the allocation/deallocation.

In case you cannot guarantee that this is always the case, it's better to change the API so that allocation & deallocation happens in the same case. For instance, your "dllB" could expose a freeResult function which just does delete[] and which is supposed to be called on the value returned by getResult.

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What i think is you are passing rs to function getResult by value becuase of which rs in the dllA function doesnt contain the valid address of memory allocated. Can you pass reference of the rs to getResult.

so function will look like following in dllB:

getResult(char* &rs)
{
     // calculate to get length
     rs = new char[lenght];
     rs = .... // do something here
}
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If the DLLs are built against different C runtimes (for example debug vs. release) you need to delete the memory in the same DLL you allocated it.

We usually solve this by providing a deleteResult method:

Dll B:

deleteResult(char *rs) {
  delete[] rs;
}

Dll A:

getResult(rs);
std::cout << rs;
// can not release rs here
if(rs) {
  deleteResult(rs);
}
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The typical solution is to use one memory allocator. Usually, that's the DLL version of the CRT. When you're using Microsoft COM, it's IMalloc or equivalently CoTaskMemAlloc/Free. A few of the answers suggest using a per-DLL deallocation function. That works, but is a major pain.

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