Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Imagine that I accept a piece of code from a user and want to just check whether the given string is a valid JS or not? Just from the syntax perspective.

function checkCode(x){
// Logic

}
// returns a boolean, whether 'x' is syntactically right or wrong.

I don't want solutions with eval, since the whole nodejs process gets in to a syntax error when the given code, 'x' is syntactically wrong.

share|improve this question
1  
This is easy, you shouldn't! Accepting code from a user and inserting it into your serverside codebase is probably one of the worst things you can do ? – adeneo Nov 20 '13 at 13:52
1  
As a sidenote, to check if the code is "runnable" you can just insert it into a try/catch block and catch any errors. – adeneo Nov 20 '13 at 13:53
3  
If it's gonna run in the user's browser then you could just eval it there without round-tripping through the server. try/catch should catch the error. Doing it directly will also give feedback to the user quicker. – Supr Nov 20 '13 at 14:07
2  
Even if the browser validates the javascript, do not send it to the server to be executed unless you don't care about security. – WiredPrairie Nov 20 '13 at 15:12
3  
@Skeptical Never perform validation on the client. Though I suppose based on this question that there are bigger flaws in your security. – Kendall Frey Nov 20 '13 at 20:56
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Don't use eval that is literally the same as handing over the control of your server to the public internet. Anyone can do anything with your server - delete files, leak files, send spam email and so on. I am shocked that the answer had received 3 upvotes by the time I noticed it.

Just use a Javascript parser like esprima http://esprima.org/

Here is a syntax validator example it can even collect multiple errors: https://github.com/ariya/esprima/blob/master/demo/validate.js#L21-L41

share|improve this answer

To check a string contains syntactically valid JavaScript without executing it (which would be an incredibly bad idea), you don't need a library, you may use the parser you already have in your JS engine :

try {
     new Function(yourString);
     // yourString contains syntactically correct JavaScript
} catch(syntaxError) {
     // There's an error, you can even display the error to the user
}

Of course this can be done server side.

Check this demonstration

share|improve this answer

If it's gonna run in the user's browser then you could just eval it there without round-tripping through the server. try/catch should catch the error. Doing it directly will also give feedback to the user quicker.

I already had some code lying around after an experiment. I modified it slightly and put it in a jsfiddle.

Basically just use try/catch:

try {
    eval('Invalid source code');
} catch(e) {
    alert('Error: '+e)
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Wtf? You are directly evaluating user input as code on server side! – Esailija Nov 20 '13 at 20:53
2  
Not a good idea – Shea Nov 20 '13 at 20:58
3  
@Esailija No I'm not. Read my original comment on the question: This is meant to run in the client browser, where security is not an issue since the user has full power to do anything anyway. Should have repeated that in the answer here though. – Supr Nov 21 '13 at 6:48

Perhaps you can try JSLint.

https://github.com/douglascrockford/JSLint

It's a little bit heavy but it work well.

share|improve this answer
3  
That does too much. There are plenty of tools that aren't so opinionated. – Blue Skies Nov 20 '13 at 14:01
    
@BlueSkies This was my first idea. But you're certainly right. – Techniv Nov 20 '13 at 14:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.