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I'm still on Snow Leopard (I know...) so forgive if this is fixed in one of the later versions of OS/X, but I want to do standard "seq" aka:

for i in `seq 1 100` ; do
  cat /whatever > $i.txt ;
done

I thought installing GNU tools would do it, but apparently not.

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Does for i in {1..100} work to you? –  fedorqui Nov 20 '13 at 16:25
1  
You can probably use $(command) rather than the backtick syntax that I'm too lazy to figure out how to show in a comment. It's a bit easier to read, and it can be nested. –  Keith Thompson Nov 20 '13 at 16:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

On my mac both of these work (OS X 10.8.5)

Andreas-Wederbrands-MacBook-Pro:~ raven$ for i in {1..10}; do echo $i; done
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Andreas-Wederbrands-MacBook-Pro:~ raven$ for i in `seq 1 10`; do echo $i; done
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
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It looks like you're on a newer version of OS/X. I get "seq command not found," however, the {1..10} works! Thanks! –  philo vivero Nov 20 '13 at 16:46

No need for a tool such as seq -- bash (like ksh and zsh) has syntax built-in:

# bash 3.x+
for ((i=0; i<100; i++)); do
  ...
done

...or, for bash 2.04+, zsh, and ksh93:

i=0; while ((i++ <= 100)); do
   ...
done

...or, for absolutely any POSIX-compliant shell:

while [ $(( ( i += 1 ) <= 100 )) -ne 0 ]; do 
  ...
done

bash also supports expansions such as {0..100}, but that doesn't support variables as endpoints, whereas the for-loop syntax is more flexible.

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In Snow Leopard, you can use the jot command, which can produce sequential data like seq (and more, see the man page for details).

$ jot 5
1
2
3
4
5
$ jot 3 5
5
6
7
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Is jot standards-compliant? (Granted, seq isn't either, but it'd be nice to point folks towards tools that will be available wherever their shell is). –  Charles Duffy Nov 20 '13 at 16:52
    
I don't think there is a standards-compliant answer; brace expansion and C-style loops are absent from POSIX. jot is nice to know, as it's the seq-equivalent program available in OS X 10.6 (seq itself ships with 10.8+, maybe 10.7 as well). Anyway, the accepted answer and yours covers the bash options well enough. –  chepner Nov 20 '13 at 17:33
    
I do cover the POSIX option near the bottom of my answer; it's the third code block. –  Charles Duffy Nov 20 '13 at 19:15
1  
For the curious. jot is a BSD utility. Available on all BSD systems and whatever borrowed from that (such OSX). AFAIK it's not available on any other UNIX system (Solaris, AIX, etc) or Linux, although it can often be installed as a package. It is somewhat unfortunate that the GNU folk created seq(1), instead of adopting/duplicating jot, which had already been around for a number of years... –  Carpetsmoker Feb 10 at 6:20

Or, just add this to your bash profile:

function seq {
  if [ $1 > $2 ] ; then
    for ((i=$1; i<=$2; i++))
      do echo $i
    done
  else
    for ((i=$1; i>=$2; i--))
      do echo $i
    done
  fi
}

It's not that hard.

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