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I'm using JQuery v2.0.0

How do I make these functions run in top to bottom order instead of an asynchrous-like effect or order, meaning don't let the function "foo2()" run before the function "foo1()" is done first.

foo1();

$.when( foo2() )
    .done(function() { $('#test').dialog('close');  foo3(); })
    .fail(function() { alert('You have a problem!!');  foo3(); });

Thanks...

share|improve this question
2  
Use .done on foo1(), assuming foo1() returns a promise object. also, your $.when is not necessary, you can do foo2().done, also assuming foo2() returns a promise object. If neither return promise objects, then your code won't work. – Kevin B Nov 20 '13 at 16:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming foo1 looks something like this:

function foo1() {
    var promise = $.Deferred();
    $.ajax({...}).done(function() { promise.resolve(); })
        .fail(function() { promise.reject(); });
    return promise;
}

You can do this:

foo1().done(function() {
    $.when( foo2() )
        .done(function() { $('#test').dialog('close');  foo3(); })
        .fail(function() { alert('You have a problem!!');  foo3(); });
});

...or as @Kevin B mentioned, like this:

foo1().done(function() {
    foo2()
        .done(function() { $('#test').dialog('close');  foo3(); })
        .fail(function() { alert('You have a problem!!');  foo3(); });
});

...but as comments point out, a better implementation of foo1 would look like this, which you can do as long as foo1 doesn't need to do any custom work during done, fail, or always.

function foo1() {
    return $.ajax({...});
}

Otherwise, if foo1 is not async in any way, it will always complete first.

share|improve this answer
1  
@fletchsod "if foo1 is not async in any way, it will always complete first." – A. Wolff Nov 20 '13 at 17:17
3  
function foo1() { return $.ajax() } and foo2().done(...) to simplify code – A. Wolff Nov 20 '13 at 17:20
1  
To clarify what A. Wolff said: $.ajax is already a deferred, so there is no reason to wrap it in another deferred. – jcbelanger Nov 20 '13 at 17:24
2  
Also, the promise variable in foo1. is really a deferred and not a promise. The difference between the two is deferreds can be canceled and promises cannot (think read-only). You can create a read-only version by calling the .promise() method on a deferred. – jcbelanger Nov 20 '13 at 17:27
1  
Also, the accepted answer is using nested callbacks to control the sequence. While this works, it is missing one of the major benefits of using deferreds: to AVOID callback hell. – jcbelanger Nov 20 '13 at 18:10

Deferreds are great for controlling the sequence of async code. From your question, I'm assuming foo1, foo2, and foo3 are async actions. I'll use ajax, setTimeout, and webworkers to demonstrate the concepts behind deferreds:

//out-of-the-box jquery support:
//jQuery already implements deferreds for$.ajax() .annimate(), .slideUp()
//ajax:
function foo2() {
    return $.ajax(...); //already deferred!
}

//Manually implement deferred by resolving/rejecting where appropriate
//timeout:
function foo1() {
    var deferred = new $.Deferred();

    setTimeout(function() {
        deferred.resolve("woot"); //pass data to .done() callbacks
    }, 3000);

    return deferred.promise(); //provide read-only access: a promise is missing .reject()/.resolve() methods
}

//Deferred that can be canceled:
//webworker:
function foo3() {
    var deferred = new $.Deferred();

    var worker = new Worker('doWork.js');

    worker.addEventListener('message', function(e) {
        worker.terminate();
        deferred.resolve(e.data); //pass data to .done() callbacks
    }, false);

    //called when canceled.
    deferred.fail(function() {
        worker.terminate();
    });

    return deferred; //NOT read-only, can be canceled by calling code

    //var foo3Process = foo3()
    // ... 
    //foo3Process.reject(); //canceled by outside world!
}

A single deferred can take as many .done(), .fail(), or other callbacks as you want.

foo1()
    .done(foo2)
    .done(foo3)
    .fail(foo4)
    .always(foo4)
    .progress(foo4) //works for .animation() out-of-the-box

The other major benefit of using deferreds, is to AVOID nesting callbacks (callback hell)

function serialTaskViaCallBackHell() {
    var deferred = new $.Deferred();

    foo1().done(function() {
       foo2().done(function() {
           foo3().done(function() {
               foo3().done(function() {
                   deferred.resolve(); 
                   //YUCK! too much indentation/matching parens!
               });
           });
       });
    });

   return deferred.promise();

}

Don't even think about implementing .fail() and .progress() for each and every nest level!

You can better control the sequence of tasks with .then() and $.when(). To finally answer your question, here's an example of how to use deferreds to control the sequence of events:

function serialTask() {
  return foo1()
    .then(foo2)
    .then(foo3)
    .then(foo4); //NOT NESTED!
}

serialTask()
  .done(...)
  .fail(...);

Similarly you can easily control parallel tasks:

function parallelTask() {
  return $.when(foo1, foo2, foo3, foo4);
}

parallelTask()
  .done(...)
  .fail(...) //one or more failed
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the wonderful examples. I do not know how to split the accepted answer to 2 accepted answers though... – fletchsod Nov 20 '13 at 20:09
    
P.S. - Don't forget that .then() is depreciated in the lastest JQuery version. ;-) – fletchsod Nov 20 '13 at 20:22
    
@fletchsod I think you are thinking of .pipe(). They deprecated that in favor of .then(). It is important to note, that if you do NOT return a new deferred from .then(), it will behave as .done() – jcbelanger Nov 20 '13 at 20:41

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