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I need to create a class for a car that moves on a horizontal line. The constructor must only have one argument and this is where it is throwing me off. I can only have one argument to initialize the initial position of the bug. It should default to a value of 0 and the initial direction should always be one. But i'm not sure i can do this without 2 arguments in the constructor. I also need two mutator methods for moving and turning the car as well as a accessor method that will display the location of the car.

Example: position 5 direction right: .....>; position 2 direction left: ..<

class Bug:

    def __init__(self, iPosition=0):
        self.position = iPosition

    def move(self):
        pos = self.postion

    def turn(self):
        direction = self.position

    def display(self):
        if direction < 0:
            x = '<'
        elif direction > 0:
            x = '>'
        for i in range(pos):
            y = '.' + y
        return (y,x)
share|improve this question

Your code in the display() function should give you the answer. It has the movement being to the left for negative direction. Hence, a negative value in the constructor's parameter could represent movement to the left.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but when i test the function using Bug(10) it tells me '<_main_.Bug instance at 0X00000079E67C8>` – user3014014 Nov 20 '13 at 17:33
    
... yes? It has made the instance you requested, what is the problem? – kindall Nov 20 '13 at 18:17
    
It's not actually displaying the .'s and the >'s when i test the function using tester = Bug(10) – user3014014 Nov 20 '13 at 23:44

This might be more like what you need:

class Bug:

    def __init__(self, iPosition=0):
        self.position = iPosition
        self.direction = 1

    def move(self, distance=1):
        self.position += self.direction * distance

    def turn(self):
        self.direction = -self.direction

    def display(self):
        if self.direction < 0:
            x = '<'
        elif self.direction > 0:
            x = '>'
        y = ''
        for i in range(self.position): # this is not right if position is negative; maybe abs()?
            y = '.' + y
        return (y,x)
share|improve this answer
    
Just one question: Where is y being defined in the display() function? – RobH Nov 20 '13 at 17:54
    
@RobH Good point... this was pretty much a copy-pasta-tweak, and I missed that y was not defined. Added an explicit initialization... – twalberg Nov 20 '13 at 18:00
    
How do I create a bug object at position 10 using another function? Is it simply Bug(10)? – user3014014 Nov 20 '13 at 18:19
    
@user3014014 Yes, something like some_variable = Bug(10) would create a Bug object and call it's constructor with 10 as the first (non-self) argument. Then some_variable.turn() will turn it around, and some_variable.move() or some_variable.move(5) (or any other value) will move it. – twalberg Nov 20 '13 at 18:22
    
the only problem i'm facing now is that it won't display the .'s and >'s. Is there something i'm doing incorrectly? – user3014014 Nov 20 '13 at 23:04

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