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I have this piece of code:

class C
{
    virtual vec3 f1(const A* a, B* b){...}
    virtual vec3 f2(A const* a, B const* b)
    {
        vec3 color = f1(a, b);
        ...
    }
}

I want to call f1 from f2, but I don't know how to pass b in the correct way. Now on compiling, I get:

error: invalid conversion from 'const B*' to 'B* [-fpermissive]'

I've tried vec3 color = f1(a, const_cast<B *>(b));

This compiles, but then I get a segmentation fault on execution.

Please note that I can not change any function signature. I can also not change the definition of A or B to implement a getCopy() function for instance.

UPDATE:

I found a function that returns a modified copy of b, so my problem is solved. Thank you all for convincing me to stop trying to cast it directly into f1.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you can't change the function signatures you can't solve your problem. Logically f2 is making a contract with the caller: "I will take a B* and use it, but I guarantee I won't modify the B it's pointing to". If you then pass that pointer to something else that does modify the B you have broken the contract. If f2 is intended to modify the B, the B* it takes shouldn't be const (and perhaps it should be a B&, as a side note).

And as for the crash: Modifying an object originally declared as const is undefined behavior. Realistically this means the compiler is free to do something like store it in read only memory, and other tricky things. If you then try to write to it, all bets are off. It can crash. It can work. Anything can happen.

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Would a solution be to make a copy of B, and pass that pointer? Clearly when the function returns, you don't want B to have changed. I agree it's a conundrum... –  Floris Nov 20 '13 at 17:43
1  
That would be weird since, if the second function modifies the pointer, I would assume that is because the caller wants that new value. Or, if it doesn't, then why is it being modified? –  CmdrMoozy Nov 20 '13 at 17:44
1  
@CmdrMoozy - valid point. But that's essentially what the signatures are telling you. I am thinking this is an "academic exercise". –  Floris Nov 20 '13 at 17:45

The only logical solution would be

virtual vec3 f2(A const* a, B const* b)
{
    B mutableB(*b);
    vec3 color = f1(a, &mutableB);
    ...
}

The run-time is free to crash because modifying a previously const declared variable after a const_cast is undefined behavior. And I'm guessing b is originally const, and f1 tries to modify it.

Think about it from the compiler's POV: you want two functions - f1 and f2. You can pass constant parameters to f2, thus guaranteeing you're not going to modify them. But then you try to pass them to f1, which can modify them.

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If f1 modifies the pointer's target, then so does f2; so f2 can't take a pointer to const object. You'll have to remove the const from f2, and not try to call it with a constant object. You're not allowed to modify const objects, and the program could crash (or otherwise have undefined behaviour) if you try to.

If f1 doesn't modify it, then change that pointer to const. It sounds like it does, though.

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