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I have to find prime numbers for t cases. Examples of input / output below:

Input:
2
1 10
3 5

Output:
2
3
5
7

3
5

Notice the space between the answers as well.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

bool prime (int x, int y);

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int t, x, y;
    cin >> t;
    for(int i = 0; i < t; i++)
        cin >> x >> y;
    for(int i = 0; i < t; i++){
        for (int i = x; i <= y; i++)
            cout << prime(x, y) << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

bool prime(int x, int y){
    bool prime = true;
    for (int i = x; i <= y; i++){
        for (int j = 2; j <= sqrt(i); j++)
            if (i % j == 0)
                prime = false;
    return prime;
    }
}

My program outputs only 1 all the time, why is that?

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What are "t cases"? –  Jim Garrison Nov 20 '13 at 18:20
    
t means the amount of test cases <= 10. For example, in the example it's 2, means I have to output the prime numbers in 2 intervals. –  user3002211 Nov 20 '13 at 18:22
    
You have a function that returns true if any number in the range is prime, and you keep calling that and printing the result. Perhaps you should find the set of prime numbers and print each of those. –  Mike Seymour Nov 20 '13 at 18:25
1  
I don't know how much it will affect your program, but I would recommend changing your inner loop in main() to use a variable name other than i. It's just good practice to not overshadow variables like that. –  jonhopkins Nov 20 '13 at 18:25
    
better to use the offset sieve of Eratothenes. C code here. You will have to know the range of your tests in advance, or you'll have to extend the core array as needed. –  Will Ness Nov 22 '13 at 7:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are outputting the result of prime(x, y), which is a bool. This will always be zero or one.

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