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This is my first post so apologies if I haven't quite got the framing of the question quite right yet. I'll put my hands up straight away and say this is part of my 'homework', I've got about 99% of it done but I've got this niggling bug that has been driving me crazy all week and I simply can't see the wood through the trees here.

The basic concept is that we have a text file, a poem of sorts, that our program has to look at and then place into a binary tree. We should record each word, the occurrence of each word and which line it appears in. I have managed to do that, save for that for in the example "And I went to StackOverFlow and I asked the question, and the answer was..." my program should return that the word "And" appears in line 1 (which it currently does), but it is currently recording every occurrence of that word and it should only record that the word "and" occurs in line 1 and not every instance of it.

So in the above example "And I went to StackOverFlow and I asked the question, and the answer was.."

So just picking out the word "And" here since it occurs multiple times, my program is currently returning:

"And [1, 1, 1]"

But it should be returning:

"And [1]"

I have supplied the code for the entire program, but the method I think to focus on is the recordWord method, at the final else if, something isn't quite right there clearly! Apologies if this explanation is hugely convoluted but I couldn't think of another way to explain it! Any help would be hugely appreciated

import java.util.*;

/**
 * A class representing a binary tree containing words.
 * 
 */
public class WordTree {

    public String word;
    public ArrayList<Integer> lineNumbers;
    public WordTree left, right;

    /**
     * Constructs a tree consisting of a single node, with the given word and
     * line number.
     * 
     * @param w
     *            the word
     * @param lineNo
     *            the line number
     * @pre true
     * @post word tree containing word w on line lineNo has been constructed
     */
    public WordTree(String w, int lineNo) {
        word = w;
        lineNumbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        lineNumbers.add(lineNo);
        left = null;
        right = null;
    }

    /**
     * Records a new occurrence of the given word, in the tree.
     * 
     * @param w
     *            the word
     * @param lineNo
     *            the line number
     * @pre this is a well formed binary search tree
     * @post if word was not in this tree, then the word and its line number
     *       line have been inserted into ordered word tree, else line has been
     *       appended to line-number list for word (if we haven't already
     *       recorded that line number for this word)
     */
    public void recordWord(String word2, int lineNo) {
        if (word.compareToIgnoreCase(word2) < 0) {
            if (right != null) {
                right.recordWord(word2, lineNo);
            } else {
                right = new WordTree(word2, lineNo);
            }
        } else if (word.compareToIgnoreCase(word2) > 0) {
            if (left != null) {
                left.recordWord(word2, lineNo);
            } else {
                left = new WordTree(word2, lineNo);
            }

        } else if (word.compareToIgnoreCase(word2) == 0) {

            lineNumbers.add(lineNo);

        }
    }

    // System.out.println("method recordWord not implemented yet");

    /**
     * Displays all the words in this tree.
     * 
     * @pre this is a well formed binary search tree
     * @post words have been written out in alphabetical order, each followed by
     *       ascending list of line numbers on which the word occurs
     */
    public void display() {

        if (left != null) {
            left.display();
        }
        System.out.println(word + lineNumbers);

        if (right != null) {
            right.display();
        }

    }

    /**
     * Counts how many different words there are in this tree.
     * 
     * @pre this is a well formed binary search tree
     * @return the number of different words in tree
     */
    public int numberOfEntries() {
        int count = 1;
        if (left != null) {
            count += left.numberOfEntries();
        }
        if (right != null) {
            count += right.numberOfEntries();
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
From what I can see the [1,1,1] output is correct. Why are you assuming it should only output [1] when "And" has 3 occurrences in your example, all on line 1? If you only want it to record the first instance then your call to lineNumbers.add(lineNo) should have some sort of additional check –  TheCapn Nov 20 '13 at 19:13
    
"SHOULD return that the word "And" appears in line 1 [...], but it is currently recording every occurrence of that word" That's why. Try to check if your word-line pair is already in your tree. That could help. –  Sebastian Höffner Nov 20 '13 at 19:17
    
Just to be clear, I'm working from quite a constrained specification here. The specification has suggested implementing the code so that it records every instance of a word in a line first, as that is easier, and then going back and updating it so it just displays that the X appears in Y sentence but disregards how many times. My code currently counts every instance of a word in the sentence, which according to the specification is not what they want –  JavaStarta Nov 20 '13 at 19:22
1  
How about a Set<Integer> lineNumbers? Or even better have the line words as a Set (HashSet, TreeSet=OrderedSet) so one adds the words per line only once. –  Joop Eggen Nov 20 '13 at 19:27
    
Joop your solution sounds quite interesting, but I'm not sure how I'd implement that. I've been coding for a very, very short time and everything is an uphill battle at the moment! Would you be able to point me in the right direction please? –  JavaStarta Nov 20 '13 at 19:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since List accepts duplication, it may accepts elements with the same value. Instead, you could use Set interface which eliminates duplication for you automatically. In your example, you can declare lineNumbers as a TreeSet to print the output in ascending line number.

Declare lineNumbers as a Set

public Set<Integer> lineNumbers;

Then initialize it in the constructor using TreeSet

lineNumbers = new TreeSet<Integer>();

It's all that you need to change. Hope it's clear enough.

share|improve this answer
    
That solved the problem perfectly, thanks very much! I'm going to go read up on the "Set" interface now, which I hadn't considered before. Thanks again! –  JavaStarta Nov 20 '13 at 21:06

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