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I am using matplotlib to render some figure in a web app. I've used fig.savefig() before when I'm just running scripts. However, I need a function to return an actual ".png" image so that I can call it with my HTML.

Some more (possibly unnecessary) info: I am using Python Flask. I figure I could use fig.savefig() and just stick the figure in my static folder and then call it from my HTML, but I'd rather not do that every time. It would be optimal if I could just create the figure, make an image out of it, return that image, and call it from my HTML, then it goes away.

The code that creates the figure works. However, it returns a figure, which doesn't work with HTML I guess.

Here's where I call the draw_polygon in the routing, draw_polygon is the method that returns the figure:

@app.route('/images/<cropzonekey>')
def images(cropzonekey):
    fig = draw_polygons(cropzonekey)
    return render_template("images.html", title=cropzonekey, figure = fig)

And here is the HTML where I am trying to generate the image.

<html>
  <head>
    <title>{{ title }} - image</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <img src={{ figure }} alt="Image Placeholder" height="100">
  </body>
</html>

And, as you can probably guess, when I load the page, all I get is Image Placeholder. So, they didn't like the format I fed the figure in with.

Anyone know what matplotlib methods/work-arounds turn a figure into an actual image? I am all over these docs but I can't find anything. Thanks!

BTW: didn't think it was necessary to include the python code that makes the figure, but I can include it if You guys need to see it (just didn't want to clutter the question)

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There was some work done recently for making mpl play nice with google appEnigne, The discussions about that included examples of how do to things like this. Another option is to do it like ipython notebook, which converts the png to a string and just directly embeds that. –  tcaswell Nov 21 '13 at 4:37
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have to separate the HTML and the image into two different routes.

Your /images/<cropzonekey> route will just serve the page, and in the HTML content of that page there will be a reference to the second route, the one that serves the image.

The image is served in its own route from a memory file that you generate with savefig().

I obviously didn't test this, but I believe the following example will work as is or will get you pretty close to a working solution:

@app.route('/images/<cropzonekey>')
def images(cropzonekey):
    return render_template("images.html", title=cropzonekey)

@app.route('/fig/<cropzonekey>')
def fig(cropzonekey):
    fig = draw_polygons(cropzonekey)
    img = StringIO()
    fig.savefig(img)
    img.seek(0)
    return send_file(img, mimetype='image/png')

Your images.html template the becomes:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>{{ title }} - image</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <img src="{{ url_for('fig', cropzonekey = title) }}" alt="Image Placeholder" height="100">
  </body>
</html>
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Miguel, first of all, just wanna say that your flask tutorial is utterly amazing. +1 just for that. But, I'm still getting the placeholder text when I navigate to that page. Is it perhaps a problem that has nothing to do with flask (i.e. the format that is returned by draw_polygons(cropzonekey)? –  Alex Chumbley Nov 20 '13 at 22:16
    
After installing my changes navigate to http://localhost:5000/fig/cropzonekey in your browser. Do you see the image then? –  Miguel Nov 20 '13 at 22:20
    
Wow, yes it worked. Just didn't re-route to the right place, but I can fix that. Thanks so much, perfect answer! –  Alex Chumbley Nov 20 '13 at 22:24
    
@Miguel Do you see any change to integrate the matplolib web_agg backend with flask? Here is an example that integrates it in Tornado, however I can't figure out how to integrate it in flask. –  bmu Nov 21 '13 at 6:45
    
@bmu: You need web sockets for that, so the port effort is non-trivial. –  Miguel Nov 21 '13 at 7:03
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