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I'm curious of how su -c "cmd arg" and tomcat works within a shell script.

Manually from the cmd line, I ran:

su -m tomcat -c /path/to/tomcat/catalina.sh start

This didn't work. However, if I put the cmd in quotes, it worked

su -m tomcat -c "/path/catalina.sh start"

Within a shell script (trying to run chkconfig so it starts automatically), I have something like this:

START="/path/catalina.sh start"
...
...
su -m tomcat -c "$START"

The command is in quotes since I found out manually that quotes are required. When I run the script, the output comes back as:

Using CATALINA_BASE:   /apps/local/apache-tomcat-7.0.42
Using CATALINA_HOME:   /apps/local/apache-tomcat-7.0.42
Using CATALINA_TMPDIR: /apps/local/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/temp
Using JRE_HOME:        /usr/java/default
Using CLASSPATH:       /apps/local/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/bootstrap.jar:/apps/local/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/tomcat-juli.jar
Usage: catalina.sh ( commands ... )
commands:
  debug             Start Catalina in a debugger
  debug -security   Debug Catalina with a security manager
  jpda start        Start Catalina under JPDA debugger
  run               Start Catalina in the current window
  run -security     Start in the current window with security manager
  start             Start Catalina in a separate window
  start -security   Start in a separate window with security manager
  stop              Stop Catalina, waiting up to 5 seconds for the process to end
  stop n            Stop Catalina, waiting up to n seconds for the process to end
  stop -force       Stop Catalina, wait up to 5 seconds and then use kill -KILL if still running
  stop n -force     Stop Catalina, wait up to n seconds and then use kill -KILL if still running
  configtest        Run a basic syntax check on server.xml - check exit code for result
  version           What version of tomcat are you running?
Note: Waiting for the process to end and use of the -force option require that $CATALINA_PID is defined

This output is like if I manually ran catalina.sh w/o any start/stop arguments.
Why is the start/stop option being ignored in the shell script? Yes, I replaced catalina.sh with startup.sh and shutdown.sh and that made the script work but I'm still curious why inside a script, su -c "cmd arg" seemed to ignore the argument portion of the command.

Thanks in advance for your explanation. I'll shoot myself if it's something as easy as shell expansion and quote removal unless I do something to make it not lose the quote.

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I don't think this phenomenon has anything to with Tomcat or the catalina.sh script in particular. Looking at the su manual page it says that the -c is followed by a single command. Maybe this was the developer's somehow inelegant way to state that only the immediately following parameter will be interpreted as command and not potentially following parameters. In this respect it behaves differently from e.g. ssh or rsh which interpret all following parameters of the shell call as parameters to the command to be executed. I guess the quoting is simply required. –  Marcus Rickert Nov 20 '13 at 23:17

1 Answer 1

I use the following in my tomcat init files:

...
su -l $TOMCAT_USER -c $CATALINA_HOME/bin/startup.sh
...

The -l creates a login shell and allows you to pass what you need.

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