Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use a for expression to iterate over a list, then do a transformation on each element using a utility that returns a Future. Long story short, it doesn't compile, and I'd like to understand why. I read this question, which is similar, and was a great help, but what I'm trying to do is even simpler, which is all the more confusing as to why it doesn't work. I'm trying to do something like:

import scala.concurrent.Future
import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global

val numberList = List(1, 2, 3)
def squareInTheFuture(number: Int): Future[Int] = Future { number * number}
val allTheSquares = for {
                          number <- numberList
                          square <- squareInTheFuture(number)
                        } yield { square }

And what I get is:

error: type mismatch; found : scala.concurrent.Future[Int] required: scala.collection.GenTraversableOnce[?] square <- squareInTheFuture(number) ^

Can someone help me understand why this doesn't work and what the best alternative is?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

flatMap requires that the type constructors of numberList and squareInTheFuture(number) are the same (modulo whatever implicit conversions the collection library does). That isn't the case here. Instead, this is a traversal:

val allSquaresInTheFuture: Future[List[Int]] =
    Future.traverse(numberList)(squareInTheFuture)
share|improve this answer

Your for comprehension is the same as

val allTheSquares = numberList.flatMap(number => squareInTheFuture(number))

flatMap requires that it's argument function returns a GenTraversableOnce[Int], however yours returns a Future[Int], hence the mismatch.

share|improve this answer

@Lee is correct. As an addition, if you are trying to do parallel computation:

  val numberList = List(1, 2, 3)
  val allTheSquares = numberList.par.map(x => x * x)(breakOut)

If you really want Future:

val allTheSquares: Future[List[Int]] = Future.traverse(numberList)(squareInTheFuture)
share|improve this answer

The Future companion object has a traverse method that does exactly what you want:

val allTheSquares: Future[List[Int]] =
  Future.traverse(numberList)(squareInTheFuture)

This will asynchronously start all the computations and return a future that will be completed once all of those futures are completed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.