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Inputting a vector I'd like to write a function that gives successive differences between elements. Ideally the function should input a vector x and parameter n that designates nth difference.

Sample in the form [x n]

Input 1: [16 10 8 6 4 2] 1 (1 for first difference)

Output 1: [-6 -2 -2 -2 -2]

Input 2: [16 10 8 6 4 2] 2

Output 2: [4 0 0 0 nil nil]

Symbolically here's what is going on for sample 2 (meant as illustration of idea, not Clojure code)

[a b c d e f] 2

[a-2b+c, b-2c+d, c-2d+e, d-2e+f]

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Same as @Shlomi 's answer but with an optional step size parameter:

(defn diff
  ([a]
    (map - (next a) a))
  ([a step]
    (map - (nthnext a step) a)))

(defn nthdiff
  ([a n]
    (nth (iterate diff a) n))
  ([a n step]
    (nth (iterate #(diff % step) a) n)))
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Here you go:

(def a [16 10 8 6 4 2])

(defn diff [a] 
  (map - (rest a) a))

(defn diff-n [a n]
  (nth (iterate diff a) n))

(diff-n a 1) ; => (-6 -2 -2 -2 -2)
(diff-n a 2) ; => (4 0 0 0)
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How would you include a step size with this code? Whereby differences of elements b steps apart are given. –  sunspots Nov 21 '13 at 1:46
    
I dont understand what you mean, could you try to explain better? –  Shlomi Nov 21 '13 at 8:31
    
If I input a step size of 1 with input 2 from above, I'll get back output 2. However, changing the step size to 2 for input 2 will output [4 0]. If I have l elements in the input vector, then I should expect my output to have l-n*Abs(s) elements. In the case of input 2 that is l=6, n=2, s=2, 2 elements are output and collected in a vector. –  sunspots Nov 21 '13 at 19:30

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